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So I have a hash, and for each level of the hash, I want to store its key and value. The problem is, a value can be another hash array. Furthermore, that hash can contain key value pairs where the value is again another hash array, etc, etc. Also, I won't know how deeply nested each hash will be. To give an example:

{
  :key1 => 'value1',
  :key2 => 'value2',
  :key3 => {
     :key4 => 'value4',
     :key5 => 'value5'
   },
    :key6 => {
      :key7 => 'value7',
      :key8 => {
        :key9 => 'value9'
      }
    }
  }

..And so on. What I want to do is save each key, value pair and the id of its parent. I figure this will probably be done recursively, I'm just unsure how because I'm unfamiliar with recursive functions. I know how to iterate through the data normally:

  myHash.each {|key, value|
    ...Do something with the key and value ...
  }

And so I'm guessing the recursive call will be something like this:

def save_pair (myHash)
  myHash.each {|key, value|
    if(value.class != Hash) ? Pair.create(key, value) : save_pair(value)
  }
end

This is untested, and I'm still unsure how to incorporate saving the parent ids regardless.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

If I understand the goal, then you should be able to pass in the parent to your save method. For the top level, it will be nil. The following shows the idea where puts is used as a place holder for the "save".

def save_pair(parent, myHash)
  myHash.each {|key, value|
    value.is_a?(Hash) ? save_pair(key, value) :
            puts("parent=#{parent.nil? ? 'none':parent}, (#{key}, #{value})")
  }
end

Here is an example call to it:

hash = Hash.new
hash["key1"] = "value1"
hash["key2"] = "value2"
hash["key3"] = Hash.new
hash["key3"]["key4"] = "value4"
hash["key3"]["key5"] = "value5"
hash["key6"] = Hash.new
hash["key6"]["key7"] = "value7"
hash["key6"]["key8"] = Hash.new
hash["key6"]["key8"]["key9"] = "value9"

save_pair(nil, hash)
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1  
Your adjustments work perfectly. Thanks a bunch! –  varatis Jan 6 '12 at 6:44
class Hash
  def each_with_parent(parent=nil, &blk)
    each do |k, v|
      Hash === v ? v.each_with_parent(k, &blk) : blk.call([parent, k, v])
    end
  end
end

h = { :a => 1, :b => { :c => 3, :d => 4, :e => { :f => 5 } } }

h.each_with_parent { |i| p i }
# [nil, :a, 1]
# [:b, :c, 3]
# [:b, :d, 4]
# [:e, :f, 5]
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Is there a way to reassign the results from the loop to the hash? –  Alex C Mar 11 at 17:38
    
@AlexC can you show me an example? –  maprihoda Mar 14 at 17:40
    
I managed by replacing k by v in v.each_with_parent(k, &blk) and by doing p[k] = v.to_i inside the loop. I was trying to reformat a json (changing strings to booleans/integers). –  Alex C Mar 16 at 16:53

I know this is a late reply, but I just implemented a non-recursive solution to your problem and thought it is worth sharing.

class Hash
  def deep_traverse(&block)
    stack = self.map{ |k,v| [ [k], v ] }
    while not stack.empty?
      key, value = stack.pop
      yield(key, value)
      if value.is_a? Hash
        value.each{ |k,v| stack.push [ key.dup << k, v ] }
      end
    end
  end
end

Then, coming back to your original problem, you can do:

h = {
  :key1 => 'value1',
  :key2 => 'value2',
  :key3 => {
     :key4 => 'value4',
     :key5 => 'value5'
  },
  :key6 => {
    :key7 => 'value7',
    :key8 => {
      :key9 => 'value9'
    }
  }
}
h.deep_traverse{ |path,value| p [ path, value ] }
# => [[:key6], {:key7=>"value7", :key8=>{:key9=>"value9"}}]
#    [[:key6, :key8], {:key9=>"value9"}]
#    [[:key6, :key8, :key9], "value9"]
#    [[:key6, :key7], "value7"]
#    [[:key3], {:key4=>"value4", :key5=>"value5"}]
#    [[:key3, :key5], "value5"]
#    [[:key3, :key4], "value4"]
#    [[:key2], "value2"]
#    [[:key1], "value1"]

There is also a gist version.

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Have you tried something like that?

trios = []

def save_trio(hash, parent = nil)
  hash.each do |key, value|
    value.kind_of?(Hash) ? save_trio(value, key) : trios << {:key => key, :value => value, :parent => parent}
  end
end

save_trio(myHash)
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This should do for json well. Minor enhancements to Marks code where it coverts everything to uppercase in a given hash:

 
def capitalize_hash(myHash)
      myHash.each {|key, value|
        puts "isHash: #{value.is_a?(Hash)}: " + value.to_s
        value.is_a?(Hash) ? capitalize_hash(value) : ( value.is_a?(Array) ? (myHash[key] = capitalize_array(value)) : (myHash[key] = value.try(:upcase)))
      }
    end

    def capitalize_array(myArray)
      myArray.each {|value|
        puts "isHash: #{value.is_a?(Hash)}: " + value.to_s
        value.is_a?(Array) ? capitalize_array(value) : ( value.is_a?(Hash) ? capitalize_hash(value) : value.try(:upcase))
      }
    end
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