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I have a method that takes a callback argument to execute asynchronously, but the catch block doesn't seem to be catching any exceptions thrown by the synchronous call (this.Submit refers to a synchronous method).

public void Submit(FileInfo file, AnswerHandler callback)
{
    SubmitFileDelegate submitDelegate = new SubmitFileDelegate(this.Submit);
    submitDelegate.BeginInvoke(file, (IAsyncResult ar) =>
    {
        string result = submitDelegate.EndInvoke(ar);
        callback(result);
    }, null);
}

Is there a way to catch the exception thrown by the new thread and send it to the original thread? Also, is this the "proper" way to handle async exceptions? I wrote my code so it could be called like this (assuming the exception issue is fixed):

try
{
    target.Submit(file, (response) =>
    {
        // do stuff
    });
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    // catch stuff
}

but is there a more proper or elegant way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
The catch block in your first code sample will catch an exception thrown by callback or by EndInvoke. The catch block in your second code sample will catch any exception thrown by the SubmitFileDelegate constructor or by BeginInvoke. Which one is not doing what you expect/want it to do? –  dgvid Jan 5 '12 at 19:55
    
Oops, forgot to delete that. I want the second to work properly, but at the moment, neither is. –  kevmo314 Jan 5 '12 at 19:59
    
Can you show how SubmitFileDelegate is defined? –  w0lf Jan 5 '12 at 20:14
    
It's just a very generic private delegate string SubmitFileDelegate(FileInfo file);. –  kevmo314 Jan 5 '12 at 20:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This is not a 'best practice' solution, but I think it's a simple one that should work.

Instead of having the delegate defined as

private delegate string SubmitFileDelegate(FileInfo file);

define it as

private delegate SubmitFileResult SubmitFileDelegate(FileInfo file);

and define the SubmitFileResult as follows:

public class SubmitFileResult
{
    public string Result;
    public Exception Exception;
}

Then, the method that actually does the file submission (not shown in the question) should be defined like this:

private static SubmitFileResult Submit(FileInfo file)
{
    try
    {
        var submissionResult = ComplexSubmitFileMethod();

        return new SubmitFileResult { Result = submissionResult };
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        return new SubmitFileResult {Exception = ex, Result = "ERROR"};
    }
}

This way, you'll examine the result object, see if it has the Result or the Exception field set, and act accordingly.

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't this call synchronous though? I tried putting a try/catch in the BeginInvoke callback (and following though with your example) but it didn't seem to catch the exception. –  kevmo314 Jan 5 '12 at 20:53
    
No, it's not synchronous. Please note that there are two Submit methods: the one I described above (that has to match the SubmitFileDelegate definition) and the one you presented in the question, that BeginInvokes the other (which means it's an async call). –  w0lf Jan 5 '12 at 20:58

If you're targeting .NET 4.0, you can utilize the new Task Parallel Library, and observe the Task object's Exception property.

public Task Submit(FileInfo file)
{
    return Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DoSomething(file));
}

private void DoSomething(FileInfo file)
{
    throw new Exception();
}

Then use it like this:

Submit(myFileInfo).ContinueWith(task =>
{
    // Check task.Exception for any exceptions.

    // Do stuff with task.Result
});

where DoSomething is the method you'd like call asynchronously, and the delegate you pass to ContinueWith is your callback.

More information about exception handling in TPL can be found here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd997415.aspx

share|improve this answer

In short, no.

When you call submitDelegate.BeginInvoke, it spawns the new thread, returns, and promptly exits your try/catch block (while the new thread runs in the background).

You could, however, catch all unhandled exceptions like this:

AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException += new UnhandledExceptionEventHandler(YourException);

This will catch everything in the application domain, however (not just your async method).

share|improve this answer
    
Is there a preferred way to handle exceptions then? I'm used to having callbacks be something like function(err, result) { } from the JS world, but I haven't seen anything like that in C# code samples I've looked through so I'm not sure if that's how it's supposed to be done in C#... :S –  kevmo314 Jan 5 '12 at 20:08
    
@w0lf's answer is basically that; you wrap the exception that occurs within your response type and pull it out after completion. –  Mark Avenius Jan 5 '12 at 20:45

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