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Python 2D list has weird behavor when trying to modify a single value

folks,

I am wondering if the two following statements are the same?

a = [[0]*3]*3
b = [[0]*3 for i in range(3)]

The results look the same. But would one way be better than the other? What is the difference here.

Thanks very much for your help.

nos

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4  
There are literally thousands questions covering this exact topic... –  JBernardo Jan 5 '12 at 19:53
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marked as duplicate by senderle, Junuxx, Kevin, Peter O., Ragunath Jawahar Nov 9 '12 at 3:32

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

They're not the same

>>> a[1][2] = 5
>>> a
>>> [[0, 0, 5], [0, 0, 5], [0, 0, 5]]


>>> b[1][2] = 5
>>> b
>>> [[0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 5], [0, 0, 0]]

The first one creates an outer array of pointers to a single inner array while the second actually creates 3 separate arrays.

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I was typing the exact same thing. +1 to you. –  Makoto Jan 5 '12 at 19:56
    
yup, in the first one, all three arrays are the same object. If you use integers instead for example [1]*5 instead of [[]]*5, a new integer is used in each position –  robert king Jan 5 '12 at 20:00
3  
these are not python arrays...these are python lists. –  joaquin Jan 5 '12 at 20:04
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No they are not.
In the first one you have (a list of) 3 identical lists, same reference, in the second you have three different lists

>>> a = [[0]*3]*3
>>> a
[[0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0]]
>>> a[0][0]=1

>>> a
[[1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0]]


>>> b = [[0]*3 for i in range(3)]
>>> b
[[0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0]]
>>> b[0][0] = 1

>>> b
[[1, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0]]
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+1. Try a[0].append("foo"). –  larsmans Jan 5 '12 at 19:53
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It's a classic case of shallow-copy vs deep copy, as explained here in the Python docs :)

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