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If i have tableA and tableB with three columns:

colA | colB | colC

And i need to look at only colA and colB

I have this so far, but it keeps deleting every row in my tableA:

DELETE

FROM
        dbA.dbo.tableA
WHERE 
        EXISTS(
                SELECT DISTINCT
                       a.colA
                       ,a.colB
                FROM
                        dbB.dbo.tableB b WITH(NOLOCK)
                            INNER JOIN dbA.dbo.tableA a WITH(NOLOCK) ON
                                b.colA = a.colA
                        AND
                                b.colB = b.colB
              )

Obviously i am doing something wrong but i have hit a wall and can't seem to figure out why it is still deleting all rows in tableA

Thank you.

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2  
Is the last and of the join b.colB = b.colB a typo? –  Kev Ritchie Jan 5 '12 at 20:02
1  
See Oleg's answer, what follows is a brief explanation of why you have doesn't work: Your condition is true for all rows if tA and tB share any pair of values. What you wanted is a WHERE inside of your EXISTS clause, instead of a JOIN; you already have tA.colA and tA.colB. –  Matt Jan 5 '12 at 20:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try the simplified form:

DELETE dbA.dbo.tableA
FROM dbA.dbo.tableA a WITH(NOLOCK)
JOIN dbB.dbo.tableB b WITH(NOLOCK)
  ON 
      b.colA = a.colA
  AND b.colB = a.colB

AND

actually there is an error in your query near the line

                            b.colB = b.colB

which forces extra deletions from table a

AND

You can use EXISTS instead of JOIN - as mentioned in @Stefan's answer, result will be just the same but the query will be more readable

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2  
That last bit you've mentioned does seem a mistake, but fixing it alone wouldn't help. The OP's query in its present form can delete either everything from tableA or nothing. The reason is, it joins tableB to an entirely different instance of tableA, not the one referenced in the DELETE clause and the one, too, whose rows should be tested. In any event, yours is an undoubtedly correct suggestion, +1 –  Andriy M Jan 5 '12 at 20:13
1  
yep, thanks for clearing. See also my comment to @Stephan answer about locking - it may be interesting to discuss –  Oleg Dok Jan 5 '12 at 20:16
    
Thank you for the kind invitation! :) That is one area where I do not yet feel comfortable enough to partake in discussions. Would be nice if someone else could share an opinion on the point mentioned, though. I've still got much to learn about locks. –  Andriy M Jan 5 '12 at 20:56
DELETE FROM dbA.dbo.tableA 
WHERE EXISTS
(
  SELECT *
  FROM dbB.dbo.tableB b WITH(NOLOCK) 
  where
      b.colA = dbA.dbo.tableA .colA 
  AND b.colB = dbA.dbo.tableA .colB 
) 
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 but note, that there will be placed a shared lock @ tableA from the very beginning of the statement, instead of two NOLOCK tables in join, which will place the first lock - UX lock only after there will be found the first row to delete. –  Oleg Dok Jan 5 '12 at 20:13
1  
+1, this is likely what the OP meant. –  Andriy M Jan 5 '12 at 20:17

Can you possibly make it a simpler statement?

DELETE
FROM dbA.dbo.TableA a
JOIN dbA.dbo.TableB b ON b.colA = a.colA
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