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I have a templated class Parameter which can (or must) be specialized. I want to put all my parameters in a container. How to do this if my parameters are instanciated with different types?

In the class Container, I would like to have a vector<Parameter*> from different types (int, double, ...) or something equivalent which seems to not possible.

If the Parameter class is derived from a base class, then The Container can declare the vect as vector<Base*>. But in this case, we can do nothing specific in Container::foo.

Below is my source example. One of my parameters is a QString which is not compatible with ostream.

Thanks for your comments.



    #include <QString>
    #include <vector>
    #include <iostream>
    #include <string>
    #include <sstream>
    using namespace std;

    #define P(a) cout << #a << ":" << a << endl

    /*
    class Base {

    };
    */

    template<typename T> class Parameter /*: public Base */ {
    private:
        T val;
    public:
        void setVal(const T &val) {
            this->val = val;
        }
        const T &getVal() {
            return val;
        }
        string getFoo() {
            stringstream s;
            s << val;
            return s.str();
        }
    };

    template<>
    string Parameter<QString>::getFoo() {
        stringstream s;
        s << val.toStdString();
        return s.str();
    }

    class Container {
    public:
        void push_back(Parameter *base) {
            vect.push_back(base);
        }
        void foo() {
            /* do something with the parameters */
        }
    private:
        vector<Parameter*> vect;
    };

    int main() {
        Parameter<int> pi;
        Parameter<QString> ps;

        pi.setVal(10);
        ps.setVal("QString");

        P(pi.getVal());
        P(ps.getVal().toStdString());

        P(pi.getFoo());
        P(ps.getFoo());

        Container container;
        container.push_back(&pi);
        container.push_back(&ps);
    }

Many thanks to you comments. I will follow your advice and use boost::any. Here is the updated version :



    #include <boost/any.hpp>
    #include <QString>
    #include <vector>
    #include <iostream>
    #include <string>
    #include <sstream>
    using namespace std;

    #define P(a) cout << #a << ":" << a << endl

    template<typename T> class Parameter {
    private:
        T val;
    public:
        void setVal(const T &val) {
            this->val = val;
        }
        const T &getVal() {
            return val;
        }
        string getFoo() {
            stringstream s;
            s << val;
            return s.str();
        }
    };

    template<>
    string Parameter<QString>::getFoo() {
        stringstream s;
        s << val.toStdString();
        return s.str();
    }

    class Container {
    public:
        void push_back(boost::any base) {
            vect.push_back(base);
        }
        void foo() {
            cout << "do something with the parameters\n";
            for (vector<boost::any>::iterator i = vect.begin(); i != vect.end(); ++i) {
                boost::any a = (*i);
                if (a.type() == typeid(Parameter<int>*)) {
                    Parameter<int> *ai = boost::any_cast<Parameter<int> *>(a);
                    cout << ai->getFoo() << endl;
                } else if (a.type() == typeid(Parameter<QString>*)) {
                    Parameter<QString> *aq = boost::any_cast<Parameter<QString> *>(a);
                    cout << aq->getFoo() << endl;
                } else {
                    cout << "unknown type:" << a.type().name() << endl;
                }
            }
        }
    private:
        vector<boost::any> vect;
    };

    int main() {
        Parameter<int> pi;
        Parameter<QString> ps;

        pi.setVal(10);
        ps.setVal("QString");

        P(pi.getVal());
        P(ps.getVal().toStdString());

        P(pi.getFoo());
        P(ps.getFoo());

        Container container;
        container.push_back(&pi);
        container.push_back(&ps);
        container.foo();
    }



share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by Qstring "is not compatible with ostream", and how does it relate to this problem? Are you trying to call Parameter<Qstring>::getFoo()? You can provide a method to make operator<< work with Qstring yourself, if it's meaningful. – bacar Jan 5 '12 at 20:39
    
What, exactly, are you trying to do? How does using Base not solve your problem? It sounds like you want something that's generic across multiple types whilst having some functionality that's specific to the type ("we can do nothing specific in Container::foo") - I'm not sure how you can meaningfully achieve this without downcasting somewhere. – bacar Jan 5 '12 at 20:41
    
@bacar the getFoo() in the template class does not work with QString. We have to use : s &lt;&lt; val.toStdString().<br> – user1132852 Jan 5 '12 at 20:48
    
If you provide an operator<< for QString, it should work? operator<< does not have to be defined as a QString member (if you don't have control over QString). Or, you can provide a template specialisation for Parameter<QString>. – bacar Jan 5 '12 at 20:50
    
Yes, you are right for the operator for QString. It was just an example of specialisation. The question remains for the Container class : how to store Parameters instanciated with any type in the container? Is it possible? – user1132852 Jan 5 '12 at 21:01

The correct solution is to write good enough interface for the Base class so that you can do everything you need to do:

class Base {
public:
  virtual void *GetVal() const=0;
  virtual void SetVal(void *ptr)=0;
  virtual std::string Type() const=0;
  virtual std::string GetAsString() const=0;
};

While this might not be what you want, it still allows passing values from one parameter to the next. Once you want the actual value, you do need to know the type on compile-time. Switch-case for the type might help with making it runtime.

share|improve this answer
1  
Using void* like that is pretty error-prone. I'd definitely change it to boost::any. – Paul Manta Jan 5 '12 at 20:47
    
yes, but in order to Switch-case in my Container class, I need to know all the cases> – user1132852 Jan 5 '12 at 20:53
    
it's no more error prone than using any_cast. The downcast operation is always going to be dangerous, the void* is just documenting that something dangerous is happening here. – tp1 Jan 5 '12 at 21:36
    
@tp1 That's wrong. Using any_cast you'll get an exception thrown if you use the wrong type. With void* you can't really be sure that you cast it back to the correct type. – Paul Manta Jan 5 '12 at 21:45
1  
@tp1 A fast failure is still many times better than a silent error that only becomes visible down the road. – Paul Manta Jan 5 '12 at 22:07

You could use Boost.Any which can hold any type of data. You would then use boost::any_cast<> to convert the object back to the correct type.

Other than that, you'll have to go for the base class approach, but as you mentioned, it could be hard to then make Container::foo do anything useful.

One way you could solve this problem is to have all your foo functions take a string as a parameter, then each specific implementation of the function would parse that string and convert it to the correct type.

Edit: Boost.Any example:

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/any.hpp>

int main()
{
    boost::any param = 89;

    // This will fail because `param` is currently holding an int
    // not a char
    char ch = boost::any_cast<char>(param);

    // This works
    int i = boost::any_cast<int>(param);

    // You can always change the value and type of what
    // `param` is holding
    param = "example";
}
share|improve this answer
    
your last comment is OK but the question remains : how to store Parameters instanciated with any type? Have you an example using Boost.Any? – user1132852 Jan 5 '12 at 20:57
    
@user1132852 I've posted a minimalist example of how to use Boost.Any. – Paul Manta Jan 5 '12 at 21:39
    
Boost.Any seems like overkill; the OP wants to contain related types, not any type. A vector<boost::any> doesn't seem to let you restrict the container to Parameter objects. What advantage do you get from Boost.Any here that you don't get from a simple dynamic_cast? – bacar Jan 5 '12 at 23:16
    
@bacar It was just an alternative. I also suggested to use a base class with a virtual method foo. It's up to the OP what alternative they like better. – Paul Manta Jan 6 '12 at 7:59

Every thing inside a container has to be the same type. I have done something similar to your approach where I made a base class that had some useful generic interface and the derived class was templated. The only other way to approach a solution would involve defining a base class function to return a value to indicate the type and then downcasting the base.

share|improve this answer

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