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the following code compiles well but when i try to input helper 10 primes [] [] it gives me :Non-exhaustive patterns in function helper

primes = [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 53, 59, 61, 67, 71, 73, 79, 83, 89, 97, 101, 103, 107, 109, 113, 127, 131, 137, 139, 149, 151, 157, 163, 167, 173, 179, 181, 191, 193, 197, 199, 211, 223, 227, 229, 233, 239, 241, 251, 257, 263, 269, 271, 277, 281, 283, 293, 307, 311, 313, 317, 331, 337, 347, 349, 353, 359, 367, 373, 379, 383, 389, 397, 401, 409, 419, 421, 431, 433, 439, 443, 449, 457, 461, 463, 467, 479, 487, 491, 499, 503, 509, 521, 523, 541, 547, 557, 563, 569, 571, 577, 587, 593, 599, 601, 607, 613, 617, 619, 631, 641, 643, 647, 653, 659, 661, 673, 677, 683, 691, 701, 709, 719, 727, 733, 739, 743, 751, 757, 761, 769, 773, 787, 797, 809, 811, 821, 823, 827, 829, 839, 853, 857, 859, 863, 877, 881, 883, 887, 907, 911, 919, 929, 937, 941, 947, 953, 967, 971, 977, 983, 991, 997]

eea :: Integer -> Integer -> (Integer, Integer, Integer)
eea 0 b = (0, 1, b)
eea a b = (y - b `div` a * x, x, g) where (x, y, g) = eea (b `rem` a) a

second :: (a, b, c) -> b
second (_, x, _) = x

chinese :: Integer -> [(Integer,Integer)] -> Integer
chinese n [] = 0
chinese n ((a,b):xs) = ((second(eea b (n `div`  b)) * (n `div`  b) )  * a) + chinese n (xs)

getN :: [(Integer,Integer)] -> Integer
getN [] = 1
getN ((x,y):xs) = y*(getN (xs))

chinese2 :: [(Integer,Integer)] -> Integer
chinese2 [] = 0
chinese2(x:xs) = chinese (getN (x:xs)) (x:xs)

chinese3 :: [(Integer,Integer)] -> Integer
chinese3 (x:xs) = if (chinese2(x:xs)) < 0 then chinese2 (x:xs) + (getN (x:xs)) else chinese2 (x:xs)

helper :: Integer -> [Integer] -> [Integer] -> [(Integer,Integer)] -> [Integer]
helper n [] (v) _ = []
helper n (x:y:xs) (v) (c:cs) = if (chinese3 (b:c:cs) == n) then (x:v) else helper n (xs) (x:v) ((n `mod` y,y):c:cs) where b =(n `mod` x,x)
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The problem demonstrated on ideone –  Aaron McDaid Jan 5 '12 at 21:30

3 Answers 3

chinese3 has no case for the empty list.

helper lacks several more cases, including one where the second argument has one element.

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3  
Which, by the way, GHC or GHCi will tell you if you run them with the -Wall flag. –  Carl Jan 5 '12 at 20:59
    
i've updated the helper function and the chinese3 in it should not be empty where i insert the b in it –  Fady Kamal Jan 5 '12 at 21:21

Based on the first line of the definition of helper, it will match on an empty list ([]) in the second argument. Based on the second line, it will match on a list of at least two values in the second argument (x:y:xs). This leaves a single-item list unaccounted for.

EDIT

For the sake of simplicity, let's assume that primes is defined like this:

primes = [2, 3, 5]

Now when you evaluate this expression:

helper 10 primes [] []

Clearly it's the second part of the definition of helper that will get matched here (the first part would only match if primes were an empty list). Now based on the pattern for the second parameter (x:y:xs), we can see that x will be bound to 2, y will be bound to 3 and xs will be bound to [5]. In the definition of helper you are applying the function recursively using xs as the second argument. In other words, it looks something like this:

helper 10 [5] ...

Which case of the helper function will be used here? [5] is not an empty list, so not the first one. The second case? No, that case only matches against a list of at least two values (what value would y get bound to?). I hope you can now see that you have not accounted for when helper is called with a single item list as the second parameter (which in practice will happen any time you call helper with a list of an odd number of values in the second parameter).

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i don't get i'm sorry and i've updated the code please recheck and keep in mind that chinese3 shouldn't be empty it takes the 1st element in the list primes at the where b = .... statement –  Fady Kamal Jan 5 '12 at 21:23
    
What part of the explanation doesn't make sense? All of it? I assume you understand that the expression [] will only match against an empty list, so maybe you're confused about the x:y:xs case? –  Daniel Pratt Jan 5 '12 at 21:30
    
yes the empty list [] i input the primes list which is not empty in the 2nd line and corresponds to the x:y:xs in the 3rd line –  Fady Kamal Jan 5 '12 at 21:33
    
I've added a somewhat verbose explanation of how this works out. Hopefully that helps. –  Daniel Pratt Jan 5 '12 at 21:57

What you're trying to evaluate:

helper 10 primes   []  []

Your equations for helper:

helper n  []       (v) _      = ...
helper n  (x:y:xs) (v) (c:cs) = ...

Let's try to match the first equation:

  • n = 10 matches
  • [] = primes does not match

OK, let's try to match the second equation instead:

  • n = 10 matches
  • (x:y:xs) = primes matches, with
    • x = 2
    • y = 3
    • xs = [5, 7, 11, 13, ...]
  • v = [] matches
  • (c:cs) = [] does not match

So neither pattern matches. We have a pattern match failure.

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