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I'd like to hear opinions on the best way to handle asynchronous operations with the Command pattern. Say we have the following example:

public class MyCommand 
{
   // Sets up receiver and does whatever stuff

   public void Execute()
   {  
       _myReceiver.DoSomething();
   } 
}

The problem is: MyCommand doesn't know whether MyReceiver.DoSomething() has async portions of code. If i wanted to push MyCommand into an undo stack after its execution, i couldn't guarantee that its receiver action has been fully executed, making it uncertain to know if MyCommand reached a state where undoing is possible or not.

I personally thought on the following solution:

  1. Implement some sort of state control in Command
  2. Include "BeginExecute" and "EndExecute" in Command
  3. Include events in MyReceiver and make Command subscribe to them (that seems smelly to me)

To wrap things up, MyCommand would turn into:

public class MyCommand 
{
   public MyCommand(MyReceiver receiver)
   {   
      _myReceiver = receiver;
      _myReceiver.DoSomethingFinished += () => this.EndExecute(); 
   }

   public void BeginExecute()
   {  
       this.EnterExecutionState();

       _myReceiver.DoSomething();
   } 

   public void EndExecute()
   {  
       this.LeaveExecutionState();
   } 

   // State handling related stuff
}

I now have the means to make sure the Command's receiver has finished executing whatever action and it's ready to be pushed into the undo stack. However, to event-spam every single Receiver class that contains async operations really bugs me.

I haven't found much about this topic in the Internet and would love to hear different approaches.

OBS: Make the Command manage all the asynchronous-related code isn't an option :).

share|improve this question
    
How can you say you dont know if _myReceiver.DoSomething(); has some async properties. It either completes so you know that it finished, or it returns something that allows you to control the asynchronous behaviour. Either way, there is probably something wrong with _myReceiver.DoSomething(); and not your Command. – Euphoric Jan 5 '12 at 21:25
    
Async aside how does the undo part look - does command an UndoExecution or ...? – Christian Horsdal Jan 5 '12 at 21:27
    
@Euphoric the DoSomething method could .BeginInvoke something ... – Christian Horsdal Jan 5 '12 at 21:29
    
@Euphoric suppose DoSomething uses a BackgroundWorker. How the Command would know that the action is fully completed after DoSomething returns? – ferspanghero Jan 5 '12 at 21:29
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Something like this?

public interface ICommand
{
    void Execute();
    event EventHandler Finished;
}

public class MyCommand : ICommand
{
   public MyCommand(MyReceiver receiver)
   {   
      _myReceiver = receiver;
      _myReceiver.DoSomethingFinished += () => Finished(); // dont forget null check here.
   }

   public void Execute()
   {      
       _myReceiver.DoSomething();
   } 

   public event EventHandler Finished;
}

This way, user of this command can register to Finished event so it knows when command has finished its async behaviour and can act acordingly.

Or if you dont wan't to use event, then what about callback?

public class MyCommand : ICommand
{
   public MyCommand(MyReceiver receiver)
   {   
      _myReceiver = receiver;
   }

   public void Execute()
   {      
       _myReceiver.DoSomething(() => Finished()); // dont forget null check here.
   } 

   public event EventHandler Finished;
}

Either way, there simply need to be a way for MyReciever to notify its caller, that it finished. There is no way to bypass it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer, but the problem is not related to signalling the command's finishing. I actually ommited that part from the example for the sake of simplicity. I'd like to see an approach where the use of events in the Receiver is unnecessary. In your example, i'd still have to spam the receiver with events for each async operation that could be handled. – ferspanghero Jan 5 '12 at 21:42
    
@ferspan : Unless there is common abstraction in MyReciever and everything else, that will be used in same way, then I dont see a possible solution. This is pretty huge problem in current programing and whole new C# version is commited to this problem with async, await and Task. – Euphoric Jan 5 '12 at 21:49
    
Thank you! Your approach ended up being similar to Tigram's. Thus, i ask you the same question: considering _myReceiver.DoSomething(Action action) makes lots of async calls, how would i ensure the callback would be executed after all async calls complete? – ferspanghero Jan 5 '12 at 22:04
    
@ferspan : Thats MyReciever's business. But that is different question. – Euphoric Jan 5 '12 at 22:07
    
Thanks a lot for your help! – ferspanghero Jan 6 '12 at 19:23

I think you've got way too much going on in a single class. I would break it down like this:

// An immutable command, to be handled in-process.  
// ICommand is a marker interface with no members.
public class DoSomething : ICommand 
{
    public readonly Id;

    public DoSomething(Guid id)
    {
        Id = id;
    }
}

// To be handled out-of-process.
[AsynchronousCommand]
public class DoSomethingThatTakesAReallyLongTime : ICommand
{
    public readonly Id;

    public DoSomethingThatTakesAReallyLongTime(Guid id)
    {
        Id = id;
    }
}

// This guy could take any number of dependencies: ISomethingRepository, DbContext, etc.
// Doesn't matter, but it's probably gonna have dependencies.
public class DoSomethingHandler : IHandler<DoSomething> 
{
    public void Handle(DoSomething command) // IHandler<T>'s only member
    {
        // CRUD or call call a domain method
    }
}

public class CommandService : ICommandService
{
    public void Execute(params ICommand[] commands) // ICommandService's only member
    { 
        foreach(var command in commands)
        {
            var handler = GetHandler(command); // Could use your IOC container.

            if (HasAsyncAttribute())
                new Action(() => handler.Handle(command)).BeginInvoke(null, null);
            else
                handler.Handle(command);
        }
    } 
}

// Something that might consume these
public class SomethingController
{
    private readonly ICommandService _commandService;

    public SomethingController(ICommandService commandService)
    {
        _commandService = commandService;
    }

    [HttpPost]
    public void DoSomething(Guid id)
    {
        _commandService.Execute(new DoSomething(id));
    }

    [HttpPost]
    public void DoSomethingThatTakesAReallyLongTime(Guid id)
    {
        _commandService.Execute(new DoSomethingThatTakesAReallyLongTime(id));
    }
}

The big advantage here is that you can distribute your commands to clients without explicitly dragging along all the dependencies that go with the handlers. The handlers should not be known to the client. All the client needs to know is that it sent a command, and all commands should be assumed to succeed.

share|improve this answer
    
Very nice. Thank you for that! Decorator for the win! – trailmax Nov 23 '13 at 0:17

First I would add to the name of the method Async to esplicitly signal to your Command class consumer that method executes in async way.

Second, I would add like parameter an Action<T> which will be called as method async call completes. So this method caller can be notified when async sction was terminated.

Edit

obj.DoSomethingAsync(... params, Action<T> onComplete)

share|improve this answer
    
Where exactly would i add a Action<T> parameter? If it's in BeginExecute, it would be no use, since _myReceiver.DoSomething() would return the same way, leaving us ignorant about its async state. If it's in _myReveiver.DoSomething(), i'd still stick to the events solution, which i find cleaner. – ferspanghero Jan 5 '12 at 21:36
    
@ferspan: what if I have in that class 20 async methods and excute several of them in after another. How you gonna deal with this? Each method has to define its own event? Or event will bring with itself a method definition ? Imo , the Action<T> pattern is cleaner – Tigran Jan 5 '12 at 21:45
    
@ferspan: see my edited post. – Tigran Jan 5 '12 at 21:57
    
Got it! There's one problem though: how would i ensure that Action<T> is called only after the 20 async method calls are finished? – ferspanghero Jan 5 '12 at 21:59
    
@ferspan: if you have 20 async calls made, you will recieve 20 onComplete notifications, naturally not in order the methods were called as we are talking about async execution. – Tigran Jan 5 '12 at 22:03

If you are going to impose the requirement that all processing is completed before control returns to your Execute method, without modifying the calling code's behavior, you could modify the way that your actions execute.

First initialize all your asynchronous calls and block(wait) on the current thread for calls to return. I'm not sure what the nature of your asynchronous calls are, as in if they are in a Thread that you are aware of, or will be returned on an arbitrary thread, but you should be able to come up with some kind of thread synchronization for your problem.

Try using a Semaphore to block current thread(after calling your async methods), and release the semaphore when all your async methods have returned their response(s). This will have the effect of "re-synchronizing" your async calls.

You can use another synchronization method, but a Semaphore is simple enough to understand.

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