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I've learned that there is a native solution for JSON parsing on iOS5, and it is great to be able to use that instead of the external JSON framework that the majority of people uses.

The article about how to use JSON natively on iOS is here: http://www.raywenderlich.com/5492/working-with-json-in-ios-5

Now my question: so far it seems pretty easy to handle easily formatted JSON, but I am having problems to understand how can I access more complex data schemes.

For example, if i have a JSON object that contains 3 dictionaries, and each of them contains different arrays and dictionaries as entry, I am not clear how to access this data.

In Java you could use the dot notation to access sub data, like obj1.dictionary1[3].varname, which would access the first object, go to position 3 of the dictionary1 and get the key value for the varname....how do you get to the same results using only iOS JSON capabilities?

Sadly the native JSON framework for iOS does not seems to follow the logic of use of the JSON object in Java, so I am pretty much clueless about how to achieve my objective.

Should I drop the native JSON and use the JSON framework available online?

Thanks in advance for your comments.

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"Java" or "JavaScript"? –  fge Jan 5 '12 at 22:11
    
Java, as mentioned in the post. –  user1006198 Jan 5 '12 at 23:23
    
Err no, you cannot access JSON with Java this way. It is done with external libraries to the JDK, like Jackson. –  fge Jan 5 '12 at 23:27
    
I see; I was looking for JSON tutorials and found one where they were using an example in Java with the dot notation; but from your comment it seems that the article was wrong then. –  user1006198 Jan 5 '12 at 23:29
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2 Answers

No. You cannot use "dot notation". You will have to use NSArray and its objectAtIndex together with NSDictionary and its objectForKey.

See, e.g. IOS JSON get all values from a "JSON Dict" .

The third-party libraries will, in most cases, have similar API (i.e. will return nested dictionaries and arrays). Have not seen any library to provide object-like "dot notation".

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Thanks a lot Krizz; I was hoping to save the hard manual work to get out the data from the JSON, but seems that in the end all that I get is conversion from JSON format to dictionaries and arrays format, so I can natively traverse them as if i was creating and populating them. Maybe would be nice if someone would just make an API where you call the key and get the value (specifying the hierarchy, not necessarily using dot notation); it would save a lot of time when dealing with complex JSON feeds. –  user1006198 Jan 5 '12 at 23:28
    
I believe, it is possible with KVC. –  Krizz Jan 5 '12 at 23:30
    
@Krizz Based on my research into KVC it is not necessarily possible, because KVC has no way of accessing specific array indexes. So, if your data structure happens to contain some arrays, KVC will not work. –  Matt Mc Sep 27 '12 at 2:49
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This is really a question about syntax when traversing objective-c data structures, not JSON. Look at the documentation for accessing a NSDictionary and NSArray

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Thanks for the clarification. Was my understanding that the object that parse the JSON in iOS would also implicitly act like the counterpart on Java, so I was not sure why i could not use the equivalent of the dot syntax on obj-c. So everything that the object does is the transposition from JSON to regular NSDictionary and NSArray? –  user1006198 Jan 5 '12 at 23:25
    
yes. It converts the raw JSON into basic objective-c data structures, notable, NSArrays, NSDictionaries, NSStrings and NSNumbers –  coneybeare Jan 6 '12 at 0:17
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