Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this 2 classes:

@Entity
public class Student extends User {
    ...
    @ManyToMany(mappedBy = "members", fetch = FetchType.EAGER)
    private Set<Group> groups;
    ...
    public void addGroup(Group group) {
        groups.add(group);
    }
}


@Entity
@Table(name = "Group")
public class Group implements Serializable {
    ...    
    @ManyToMany(fetch = FetchType.EAGER)
    @JoinTable(name = "member_of")
    private Set<Student> members;
    ...    
    public void addMember(Student student) {
        members.add(student);
    }
}

This is the session bean which manages their relationships:

@Stateless
public class StudentManager extends AcademicManager implements StudentManagerRemote {
    ...
    @Override
    public void requestAnswer(long requestID, RequestAnswer answer) {
        Request request = entityManager.find(Request.class, requestID);
        if(answer == RequestAnswer.YES) {
            Student student = request.getStudent();
            Group group = request.getGroup();
            group.addMember(student);
            student.addGroup(group);
            entityManager.flush();
            entityManager.clear();
        }
    }
    ...
}

It does not update db. Why? I do the same for other relationship, but this is the only ManyToMany I have.
I also tried with a query, but did not work.

EDIT: I edited the code like Mr.J4mes suggested, but it still does not work.
Moreover: why are .flush() and .clear() not necessary?

share|improve this question
    
Do you have equals and hashCode methods in your entities? If so, show them. Also show the code of the getMembers() and getGroups(). The code looks fine to me (except for the flush and clear calls, which are not useful). –  JB Nizet Jan 5 '12 at 22:39
    
Are you sure the condition if(answer == RequestAnswer.YES) evaluates to true? Unrelated to the problem: looks like you also don't need to find the Request if the condition fails. Those methods are not required to be invoked because requestAnswer method runs within a transaction which is committed when the method is done. –  Bhesh Gurung Jan 5 '12 at 22:59
    
@βнɛƨн Ǥʋяʋиɢ The method is more complex than that, it does other controls and I need the request because, regardless of the answer, I have to delete it at the end of the method (I just posted the part that does not work. Previous parts do not modify ojbect, just check a few conditions). About the condition, I am 100% sure it is true. –  Simon Jan 5 '12 at 23:06
1  
a flush is always automatically done before the transaction commit. Doing it explicitely prevents the JPA engine to group several statements together in a batch, or to avoid them completely if a rollback is needed. clear makes all attached entities detached. This means that a caller bean having already loaded the request, students of groups will find them all detached, which will make things very confusing. clear should almost never be called. –  JB Nizet Jan 5 '12 at 23:06
2  
ARe you sure the student isn't already a member of the group? That would explain why no modification is made in the DB. –  JB Nizet Jan 5 '12 at 23:24
show 3 more comments

1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

When you're calling group.getMembers(), you are just getting a copy of the Set that contains Student from the Group entity. Hence, when you update it, the Set inside your Group entity does not get updated. You have 2 choices:

  1. Get the Set from Group and set back after updating it:

    Set<Student> members = group.getMembers();
    members.add(student);
    group.setMembers(members);
    
  2. Add a method addStudent inside the Group entity & a method addGroup inside the Student entity to call in your requestAnswer method. It would be something like this:

    @Entity
    public class Group implements Serializable {
        private Set<Student> members;
    
        public void addMember(Student student) {
           this.members.add(student);
        }
    }
    
    @Stateless
    public class StudentManager extends AcademicManager implements StudentManagerRemote {
        @PersistenceContext
        private EntityManager em;
        ...
        @Override
        public void requestAnswer(long requestID, RequestAnswer answer) {
            Request request = entityManager.find(Request.class, requestID);
            if(answer == RequestAnswer.YES) {
                Student student = request.getStudent();
                Group group = request.getGroup();
                group.addMember(student);
                student.addGroup(group);
            }
        }
        ...
    }
    

Besides, you don't really need to call em.flush() and em.cancel().

share|improve this answer
1  
Why would he get a copy? This is only true if the getter explicitely makes a copy of the set (like return new HashSet<Student>(this.members);). If no copy is made, a reference to the set is returned, and the code of the OP should be fine. That's why I asked him to provide the code of the getters. –  JB Nizet Jan 5 '12 at 23:09
    
@JBNizet Hmmm. I cannot think of any other explanations for this behavior. I used to do like him and it didn't work even when the getter for Set<Student> has just this line: return students;. I am very curious :P –  Mr.J4mes Jan 5 '12 at 23:16
    
Well, the addStudent method you're suggesting does exactly the same thing as getStudents().add(...) if a copy is not made by the getter, so there should be no difference. –  JB Nizet Jan 5 '12 at 23:21
    
@JBNizet ok. I will test again on my application tomorrow after my sleep. :P –  Mr.J4mes Jan 5 '12 at 23:23
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.