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Why does the call to _something from foo call B's implementation of _something?

@interface A
@end

@implementation A
- (void) _something {
    NSLog(@"A");
}
- (void) foo {
    [self _something];
}
@end

@interface B : A
@end

@implementation B
- (void) _something {
        NSLog(@"B");
}
@end
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1  
what is foo? an A object or a B object? –  Michael Dautermann Jan 5 '12 at 22:51
    
@MichaelDautermann foo is a message that class A responds to. –  SundayMonday Jan 5 '12 at 23:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It only calls B's implementation if it is called for object of B class. This is because in objective-C, all methods are "virtual" (although this is a considerable simplification), basically due to its dynamic dispatch.

To be more correct, Objective-C has no methods. Instead, you send "messages" to objects. It is handled in runtime and object itself decides how to "respond" to this message. By default, it looks up the selector in its class and calls the associated "method" (which in case of _something is different for A and B).

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It'll do that if you call -foo on an instance of B, because B overrides the -_something method.

Method dispatch is implemented in Objective-C by message sending, so the foo method sends a message to the receiver telling it to do _something. The receiver (or the runtime on the receiver's behalf) looks up what it's supposed to do in response to any message; the message specifies a method selector and the object executes the corresponding implementation. There is a different implementation of _something for the classes A and B.

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If the object is a B, you called _something, so you get the code for B's _something. If you were expecting A's implementation, you're misunderstanding objective-C message passing. The code for the method is determined at runtime. If you come from C++, imagine all the methods are virtual.

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If you called _something on an object of class B, then you've essentially overridden it:

B *myClass = [B alloc] init];
[myClass _something];

Output:

B

Had you done the following example, you will not have overriden _something and you get class A's output:

A *myClass = [A alloc] init];
[myClass _something];

Output:

A

It really depends on the class from which you've instantiated your object due to the dynamic nature of messages:

A *myClass = [B alloc] init];
[myClass _something];

Output:

B
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