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I'm testing a model with an after create callback that I'd like to run only on some occasions while testing. How can I skip/run callbacks from a factory?

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  after_create :run_something
  ...
end

Factory:

FactoryGirl.define do
  factory :user do
    first_name "Luiz"
    last_name "Branco"
    ...
    # skip callback

    factory :with_run_something do
      # run callback
  end
end
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8 Answers 8

up vote 58 down vote accepted

I'm not sure if it is the best solution, but I have successfully achieved this using:

FactoryGirl.define do
  factory :user do
    first_name "Luiz"
    last_name "Branco"
    #...

    after(:build) { |user| user.class.skip_callback(:create, :after, :run_something) }

    factory :user_with_run_something do
      after(:create) { |user| user.send(:run_something) }
    end
  end
end

Running without callback:

FactoryGirl.create(:user)

Running with callback:

FactoryGirl.create(:user_with_run_something)
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2  
note that after_build is deprecated, use after(:build) instead –  Peter Wong Jul 17 '12 at 18:12
1  
If you want to skip an :on => :create validation, use after(:build) { |user| user.class.skip_callback(:validate, :create, :after, :run_something) } –  James Chevalier May 1 '13 at 14:56
3  
wouldn't it be better to invert the skipping callback logic? I mean, the default should be that when I create an object the callbacks are triggered, and I should use a different parameter for the exceptional case. so FactoryGirl.create(:user) should create the user triggering the callbacks, and FactoryGirl.create(:user_without_callbacks) should create the user without the callbacks. I know this is just a "design" modification, but I think this can avoid to break pre existing code, and be more consistent. –  Gnagno Jun 20 '13 at 16:21
    
As @Minimal's solution notes, the Class.skip_callback call will be persistent across other tests, so if your other tests expect the callback to occur, they will fail if you try to invert the skipping callback logic. –  mpdaugherty Jul 26 '14 at 3:42
    
I ended up using @uberllama's answer about stubbing with Mocha in the after(:build) block. This lets your factory default to running the callback and doesn't require resetting the callback after every usage. –  mpdaugherty Jul 26 '14 at 3:59

When you don't want to run a callback do the following:

User.skip_callback(:create, :after, :run_something)
Factory.create(:user)

Be aware that skip_callback will be persistant across other specs after it is run therefore consider something like the following:

before do
  User.skip_callback(:create, :after, :run_something)
end

after do
  User.set_callback(:create, :after, :run_something)
end
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2  
I like this answer better because it explicitly states that skipping callbacks hangs around on the class level, and therefore would continue to skip callbacks in subsequent tests. –  siannopollo Feb 20 '14 at 22:53

Calling skip_callback from my factory proved problematic for me.

In my case, I have a document class with some s3-related callbacks in before and after create that I only want to run when testing the full stack is necessary. Otherwise, I want to skip those s3 callbacks.

When I tried skip_callbacks in my factory, it persisted that callback skip even when I created a document object directly, without using a factory. So instead, I used mocha stubs in the after build call and everything is working perfectly:

factory :document do
  upload_file_name "file.txt"
  upload_content_type "text/plain"
  upload_file_size 1.kilobyte
  after(:build) do |document|
    document.stubs(:name_of_before_create_method).returns(true)
    document.stubs(:name_of_after_create_method).returns(true)
  end
end
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This will work with current rspec syntax (as of this post) and is much cleaner:

before do
   User.any_instance.stub :run_something
end
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this is deprecated in Rspec 3. Using a regular stub worked for me, see my answer below. –  Mac E. Nov 20 '14 at 0:42

In my case I have the callback loading something to my redis cache. But then I did not have/want a redis instance running for my test environment.

after_create :load_to_cache

def load_to_cache
  Redis.load_to_cache
end

For my situation, similar to above, I just stubbed my load_to_cache method in my spec_helper, with:

Redis.stub(:load_to_cache)

Also, in certain situation where I want to the test this, I just have to unstub them in the before block of the corresponding Rspec test cases.

I know you might have something more complicated happening in your after_create or might not find this very elegant. You can try to cancel the callback defined in your model, by defining an after_create hook in your Factory (refer to factory_girl docs), where you can probably define a the same callback and return false, according to the 'Canceling callbacks' section of this article. (I am unsure about order in which callback are executed, which is why I didn't go for this option).

Lastly, (sorry I am not able to find the article) Ruby allows you to use some dirty meta programming to unhook a callback hook (you will have to reset it). I guess this would be the least preferred option.

Well there is one more thing, not really a solution, but see if you can get away with Factory.build in your specs, instead of actually creating the object. (Would be the simplest if you can).

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I'd like to make an improvement to @luizbranco 's answer to make after_save callback more reusable when creating other users.

FactoryGirl.define do
  factory :user do
    first_name "Luiz"
    last_name "Branco"
    #...

    after(:build) { |user| 
      user.class.skip_callback(:create, 
                               :after, 
                               :run_something1,
                               :run_something2) 
    }

    trait :with_after_save_callback do
      after(:build) { |user| 
        user.class.set_callback(:create, 
                                :after, 
                                :run_something1,
                                :run_something2) 
      }
    end
  end
end

Running without after_save callback:

FactoryGirl.create(:user)

Running with after_save callback:

FactoryGirl.create(:user, :with_after_save_callback)

In my test, I prefer to create users without the callback by default because the methods used run extra stuff I don't normally want in my test examples.

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This solution works for me and you don´t have to add an additional block to your Factory definition:

user = FactoryGirl.build(:user)
user.send(:create_without_callbacks) # Skip callback

user = FactoryGirl.create(:user)     # Execute callbacks
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A simple stub worked best for me in Rspec 3

allow(User).to receive_messages(:run_something => nil)
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1  
You'd need to set it up for instances of User; :run_something isn't a class method. –  Patrick Mar 20 at 0:29

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