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I'm trying to document my python code with Sphinx, but I found a problem documenting some data instantiated with exec; I have a table with names and values that I need to instantiate.

So in my code I wrote something like:

my_vars = [{'name': 'var1', 'value': 'first'},
           {'name': 'var2', 'value': 'second'}]

for var in my_vars:
    exec("{var[name]} = '{var[value]}'".format(var=var))

The problem is with Sphinx: since I'd like to maintain just the source code I used autodata, the corrisponding lines from my .rst file are:

.. autodata:: mymodule.var1

.. autodata:: mymodule.var2

that when built gave me this:

mymodule.var1 = 'first'
    str(string[, encoding[, errors]]) -> str

    Create a new string object from the given encoded string.
    encoding defaults to the current default string encoding.
    errors can be ‘strict’, ‘replace’ or ‘ignore’ and defaults to ‘strict’.

mymodule.var2 = 'second'
    str(string[, encoding[, errors]]) -> str

    Create a new string object from the given encoded string.
    encoding defaults to the current default string encoding.
    errors can be ‘strict’, ‘replace’ or ‘ignore’ and defaults to ‘strict’.

I think autodata goes looking into var1.__doc__ for a doc string and there found str.__doc__ (that is the message shown before).

I really don't know what to do and I'm searching for a way of not showing that ugly doc string (but still maintaining mymodule.var1 = 'first').

Or maybe even better a way to show my own doc, like: var1 is this. (but I wouldn't know where to put it).

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

My suggestion is this: document the variables in the module docstring instead of trying to get something usable from autodata.

mymodule.py:

""" 
This module is...

Module variables:

* var1: var1 doc
* var2: var2 doc
"""

my_vars = [{'name': 'var1', 'value': 'first'},
           {'name': 'var2', 'value': 'second'}]

for var in my_vars:
    exec("{var[name]} = '{var[value]}'".format(var=var))

...
... 

You could also use info fields:

"""

:var var1: var1 doc
:var var2: var2 doc
"""

This works, sort of, but the output is not as nicely formatted as info fields used to document class variables or function parameters.


Update: following up on comments about str subclassing. Does this work for you?

from collections import UserString   

my_vars = [{'name': 'var1', 'value': 'first', "doc": "var1 docstring"},
           {'name': 'var2', 'value': 'second', "doc": "var2 docstring"}]

for var in my_vars:
    code = """\
{0} = UserString('{1}')
{0}.__doc__ = '{2}'""".format(var["name"], var["value"], var["doc"])
    exec(code)
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this seems nice, but do you think there could be a way to put the doc string into my_vars, maybe like: {'name': 'var1', 'value': 'first', 'doc': 'var1 doc'} and then extract that doc string? –  Rik Poggi Jan 7 '12 at 14:09
    
I did fiddle a bit with some attempts at setting the __doc__ attribute on the variables, but I could not get it to work. I got error messages about __doc__ being read-only (because strings are immutable, I guess). –  mzjn Jan 7 '12 at 14:27
    
Do you think it might be a good idea to subclass str into exec to override __doc__? I just tried and it works for the documentation, but my var is not a str anymore (and since they're going to be intra-package constants I don't know if it's a good idea), what do you think? –  Rik Poggi Jan 7 '12 at 14:53
    
Is the extra complication of subclassing str just in order to document some variables really worth the hassle? I'm inclined to say "no"; I don't think I could be bothered. Perhaps there is a use case, but I don't see it based on the information given so far. –  mzjn Jan 7 '12 at 20:01
    
yeah! it works good :) thank you very much and sorry for not being able to give you the +1, this was my first question and it seems I don't have enough reputation (but when I do I'll come back) :) –  Rik Poggi Jan 8 '12 at 17:12
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Given that in this case is hard to let sphinx.ext.autodoc generate the desired documentation string because:

  • the code is evaluated through exec
  • the values might not let you overwrite the docstring

have you considered hardcoding the documentation in the rst document itself?

.. data:: mymodule.var1

   var1 is this

.. data:: mymodule.var2

   var2 is that
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yes, sure this is a way, but what i'd really like to have is write the doc string in the source conde and then find a way to get that into my rst –  Rik Poggi Jan 7 '12 at 14:06
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I realized how can you fix it. Write smth like this:

x = 55
"""
x is varibble lala
"""

Use automodule directive and Sphinx will make docs for you.

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1  
Sorry but this is not the case. The variables are not at module level, but stored as strings-pair name: value inside a dict (the reason for this is mainteinability and compatibility with an older design, anyway it's not a matter to discuss here). This mean that the variables are brough at module level with exec and this messes up the doc attribute read by sphinx. I hope to have cleared what exactly this issue is about. –  Rik Poggi Jun 10 '12 at 8:14
    
Sorry, I misunderstood. –  Stanislav Jun 11 '12 at 3:06
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