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What's the fastest method, to detect User-Agent as Metro UI Version of IE >=10 ?

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please clarify the whole idea of the question and what are you trying to do also. –  Joseph the Dreamer Jan 5 '12 at 23:38
1  
I think he's asking how to detect if your page is being served as a Metro app or in IE 10 since they both serve JavaScript/HTML/CSS –  Brandon Boone Jan 6 '12 at 1:09
3  
Actually, I think msec is asking how do you detect a web request from IE10 running in "Metro mode" versus IE10 running in "Desktop mode" (they are not the same). My answer is below. –  Kurt Schindler Jan 6 '12 at 16:04
    
As already mentioned, I don't think you can determine the metro UI specifically. It is however easy to use a little function here that you can parse the IE version with. The next step really is deciding what "features" you want to detect. Check Modernizr out, it is really nice, clean and light. I find it really useful with modern UI development. –  HankChizlJaw Jun 13 '12 at 9:43
    
My particular scenario is creating a Windows equivalent to cubiq.org/add-to-home-screen. The UI for this obviously needs to change based on Metro vs. Desktop version of the browser. If you can identify something I can do feature detection on to make this distinction, you get the bounty :) –  Robert Levy Jun 13 '12 at 13:58

10 Answers 10

up vote 12 down vote accepted
+50

So, there doesn't appear to be a definitive test to identify Metro IE vs Desktop IE, but there does seem to be a few different pieces of data you can attempt to use to assume that it is Metro. Unfortunately, none of the items I have found can't be explained away by other settings. In other words, for all the "feature" tests I have found, Desktop IE could be configured in a way to trick the tests into thinking it was running on Metro.

Is ActiveX disabled (Metro doesn't allow any activex content, but desktop IE can have it set to disabled as well):

function isActivexEnabled() {
    var supported = null;        
    try {
        supported = !!new ActiveXObject("htmlfile");
    } catch (e) {
        supported = false;
    }

    return supported;
}

User Agent string check (Metro will always run in 64bit mode, but won't on a 32bit machine, and Desktop IE can be configured to run in 64bit mode as well not sure how popular either of those options will be)

function isWin64() {
    return navigator.platform == "Win64";
}

Full screen check (Metro will always be in full screen mode, however Desktop IE can also run in full screen mode, but this could be used as supporting evidence of Metro mode)

function isFullScreen() {
   return (window.innerWidth == screen.width && 
           window.innerHeight == screen.height);
}

In short, I think you have to try to check a bunch of features, and then guess, there is no definitive way. Or you could just accept that MS doesn't want you to do this, and use feature detection for the features you want to use.

For those that want to try to provide UI to refer to the containing browser UI (to indicate how to Pin the web page for example), keep in mind that other Metro apps can embed the IE10 Metro browser as a control, so even if you could identify the browser as Metro vs desktop, the UI might not be where you'd attempt to refer to it, so this can end up being a pretty tricky situation to get right 100% of the time. So either, don't try, or you could attempt the other detection techniques and accept that there are use cases that you could be displaying the wrong UI.

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window.innerWidth == screen.width cannot be used as a test for IE metro. 1) In Desktop view, the user can press F11 to go full-screen, and the screen values are then the same as in Metro. 2) because window.innerWidth != screen.width when using snap/split-screen view (also window.screenX != 0 if IE is snapped to the right). –  robocat Oct 25 '12 at 20:50
    
Also neither window.innerHeight nor window.innerWidth may be compared to screen height/width, because they are not measured in physical pixels. The innerHeight/innerWidth values are inversely proportional to the window zoom. –  robocat Oct 25 '12 at 21:23
    
@robocat, agreed the inerWidth and innerHeight checks are flaky, but used with the other checks they can be used potentially to increase the confidence that IE is in Metro mode, since MS has been kind enough to not make available a true test for Metro mode. None of these checks on their own mean that IE is in Metro mode, as desktop IE can be configured to trick each of these checks, but it is less likely that desktop IE is configured to trick all of the checks. Ideally, MS would provide a real way to test or identify Metro mode. –  Bert Lamb Oct 26 '12 at 18:50
1  
document.documentElement.clientWidth == screen.width is better to use if sniffing for width because in Metro the clientWidth value doesn't change with zoom due to a bug in Metro (tested on IE10.0.9200.16466 on Windows 8). The value changes in Desktop depending on zoom (correct behaviour). However sniff won't correctly work if user presses F11 on desktop IE10. Try it out: jsbin.com/iqibik/2 (must use jsbin, not jsfiddle in iframe, when testing window/document variables!) –  robocat Jan 23 '13 at 3:33
2  
I've been using this method for some time successfully, but I found out that including the full screen test is relatively problematic. First of all, it's not working at all for IE11, since IE11 reports a different height (I think that the height of the address bar is now included in the screen size, while in IE10 was not). But more importantly it doesn't work when IE is snapped, which is quite common. Removing the full screen test makes the detection less secure, so be careful when using it. –  kkara Nov 4 '13 at 14:36

I don't believe there is a way to determine if a request is coming from the Metro version of IE10 versus the regular desktop mode version. Metro IE has no unique HTTP headers or user-agent string to identify it by.

Internet Explorer 10 User Agent Strings On Windows 8 64bit

Metro IE10 is a 64-bit application, so you'll see "Win64" in the user-agent string. Regular desktop IE10, by default, is 32-bit and will show "WOW64". You could sort-of make an educated guess based on this, but you would falsely identify anyone who chose to run the 64-bit version of IE10 in desktop mode. As you can see from that chart, the user-agent strings are identical. [edit: as noted in the comments, this won't work for 32-bit PCs.]

I could see why you may want to detect Metro IE, but this type of "browser sniffing" is generally discouraged because it's so cumbersome and error-prone. It would be best to feature test for certain browser functionality that you require using something like Modernizr, if you can.

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1  
+1 - Interesting to know there's a Metro version of IE10 and a normal desktop version. I was under the impression that Metro was just another interface for rendering web-content. –  Brandon Boone Jan 10 '12 at 2:20
    
On Consumer Preview, is anyone else seeing the UA for 64-bit Classic IE10 as "Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; MSIE 10.0; Windows NT 6.2; WOW64; Trident/6.0; .NET4.0E; .NET4.0C; Media Center PC 6.0)"? Note the "WOW64" instead of "Win64". –  Bullines Apr 2 '12 at 0:35
    
The problem for me is that IE10 Metro doesn't allow you to test for some of the features that differentiate it from non-Metro, notably that ActiveX extensions will never be allowed so you shouldn't bother trying to put up UI to offer to install them. I wrote a blog post about this. blog.bertlamb.com/2012/06/07/… –  Bert Lamb Jun 8 '12 at 12:56
1  
This solution won't work for 32-bit PCs where "WOW64" and "Win64" won't be present in the desktop UA either –  Robert Levy Jun 12 '12 at 18:28
    
Modernizr is not working for us in detecting IE10 in metro mode. Apparently Modernizr only detects WebKit compatible touch, see github.com/Modernizr/Modernizr/issues/548 –  Jeff Atwood Nov 20 '12 at 21:20

Thanks John Rajakumar and Alexis Pigeon. I was able to use your Metro IE check as the basis to load a separate CSS style sheet for Metro tablets (MS Surface). To add a bit more certainty in my mind, I used cssuseragent to detect IE10 first, and then combined both tests in a final yepnope test.

var IEmetrotest = ((cssua.userAgent.ie > 9) && (metrotest()));
yepnope({
    test: IEmetrotest,
    yep : ['ie_metro.css']
    });

Tested it in Browserstack and it's working as expected. (I would have up-ticked you, but don't have enough points yet.)

// Minor revisions to isBrowserSupportPlugin() previously posted
// Renamed function to metrotest() and inverted the returned value. 
var errorName = null;
function metrotest() {
    var supported = null; 
    try {
        new ActiveXObject("");
    }
    catch (e) {
        // FF has ReferenceError here
        errorName = e.name; 
    }     
    try {
        supported = !!new ActiveXObject("htmlfile");
    } catch (e) {
        supported = false;
    }
    if(errorName != 'ReferenceError' && supported==false){
        supported = false;
    }else{
        supported =true;
    }
    return !supported;
}
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+1 For showing us a working yepnope implementation –  cept0 May 1 '13 at 14:16

METRO IE never supports ActiveX or any plugin objects. Based on that the following script is tested & working fine.

//---------------------------Metro IE check-------------------------
    var errorName = null;
    function isBrowserSupportPlugin() {
        var supported = null; 
        try {
            new ActiveXObject("");
        }
        catch (e) {
            // FF has ReferenceError here
            errorName = e.name; 
        }     
        try {
            supported = !!new ActiveXObject("htmlfile");
        } catch (e) {
            supported = false;
        }
        if(errorName != 'ReferenceError' && supported==false){
            supported = false;
        }else{
            supported =true;
        }
        return supported;
    }
//----------------------------------------------------------------   
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2  
This won't work if ActiveX Filtering is enabled. –  EricLaw Sep 5 '13 at 23:14

Reliable Modern/Metro detection!

I have found a way to detect Modern versus Desktop which you can try here: http://jsbin.com/genac/2 (edit using Chrome or Firefox not IE http://jsbin.com/genac/2/edit).

It seems to be a fairly robust detection because:

  • it works even if pinch-zoomed
  • it works even if two windows snapped side by side on Modern(Metro)
  • it works even if page zoomed using ctrl-+ and ctrl--
  • it works even if desktop is fullscreen using F11 key on Desktop (autohiding taskbar)

The trick is that the page scrollbars on Modern do not make the client window size smaller (they appear above the page), but the page scrollbars on Desktop do affect client window size (usable window size is smaller).

The main downside is that the test requires that you have a scrollbar on the page to sniff the difference. Does the same difference in scrollbars happen in an iframe or autoscrollable div?

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
  <meta charset="utf-8">
    <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=EDGE" />
  <title>Metro width detector - robocat</title> 
  <script>
    function show() {
      var div = document.createElement('div');
      var s = [];
      s.push('IS METRO? ' + ((tester.offsetWidth == window.outerWidth) ? 'YES' : 'NO'));
      s.push('document.documentElement.clientWidth: ' + document.documentElement.clientWidth);
      s.push('document.documentElement.offsetWidth: ' + document.documentElement.offsetWidth);
      s.push('window.innerWidth: ' + window.innerWidth);
      s.push('window.outerWidth: ' + window.outerWidth);
      s.push('screen.width: ' + screen.width);
      s.push('screen.availWidth: ' + screen.availWidth);
      s.push('document.documentElement.getBoundingClientRect().width: ' + document.documentElement.getBoundingClientRect().width);
      s.push('tester.offsetWidth: ' + tester.offsetWidth);
      div.innerHTML = s.join('<br>');
      document.body.insertBefore(div, document.body.firstChild);
    }
    window.onresize = function() {
      show();
    }
  </script>
</head>
  <body onload="show()" style="margin:0">
    <div id="tester" style="position:absolute;left:0;right:0;"></div>
  <div style="height:10000px;width:10px;background-color:blue;"></div>
</body>
</html>

You can look at page/window dimensions using: http://jsbin.com/AbimiQup/10 (edit using Chrome or Firefox not IE http://jsbin.com/AbimiQup/10/edit)

PS: There might be some way to sniff the scrollbar difference from the runtimeStyle for body or document.documentElement because maybe -ms-overflow-style: -ms-autohiding-scrollbar is used (e.g. document.documentElement.runtimeStyle.msOverflowStyle) but I couldn't find anything.

PPS: The ActiveX method given in other answers is not particularly reliable (e.g. users can disable) and it causes UI uglyness because in IE11 it shows a "ActiveX" icon next to the url.

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Notes to self: // MS tablet detection: look at user agent for ARM; and Touch;? What about Pro tablet? "Windows Phone" for Windows Phone? Note "Tablet PC" was used for IE8/IE9? // IE9 64-bit is not same as 32-bit: "IE 9 64-bit is using an older, slower JavaScript engine, while IE 9 32-bit was using the newer, more efficient Chakra JIT. Internet Explorer 9 64-bit is an absolute dog when it comes to JavaScript performance." // RELIABLE METRO VERSUS DESKTOP TEST?!: scrollbar width zero on body - outer width minus inner width. In IE10 Metro scrollbars opaquely layer over top and are zero width. –  robocat Feb 20 at 1:55

Here is a consistent method, with no ActiveX check dependency, as tested in IE10 and IE11 specifically.

if (window.screenY === 0 && (window.innerHeight+1) !== window.outerHeight){ //IE metro/modern UI }

The first rule detect IE's full screen or modern view (which may or can also be true on IEMobile). Maximized mode being historically always associated with positive or negative screenX and screenY.

And the last rule excludes [Full screen/F11] mode, which for some reason constantly shows a 1px discrepancy between outerHeight and innerHeight as tested on IE10/Win8 and IE11/Win8.1

PS: I voluntarily do not declare window.screenX === 0. Only use screenY in order to cover Modern/Metro in snap-mode with a window context snapped to the right (i.e. screenX !== 0).

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This is excellent. I've tested this extensively on IE 10+11, metro+desktop+fullscreen. I'd add that you need to check that you're running IE (perhaps with the UA string), since other browsers can pass both of these tests in some circumstances (e.g. Chrome in fullscreen). –  aaaidan Dec 11 at 3:39
    
Also seems to work with in snapped mode, and at any zoom level! –  aaaidan Dec 11 at 3:45
    
@aaaidan I know! I tested extensively :) Indeed IE detection is a pre-requisite. The best option there, might be !!window.StyleMedia at this point, given the radical user-agent changes between IE 10, 11 and upcoming IE12. I'll eventually update my answer accordingly. –  hexalys Dec 11 at 23:23

By the sounds of it you are looking to do something along the lines of Pinning a site to the start screen within Metro. To do that you can check if a site can be pinned by using this code that was brought in with IE9 and can be done by doing something like this...

function doChecks_Browser() {    
  // full pin abilities == can pin && Win7+    
  if (pinnedSiteDetection.hasFullPinAbilityBrowser)
}

More info on that here.

From this this post on MSDN...

Windows 8 Release Preview implements pinned sites by using tiles on the Start screen. When a user clicks the tile of a pinned site, the site opens in Windows Internet Explorer 10 Release Preview in the Windows Metro style UI environment.

Hope that helps!

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Kinda… I want to prompt the user with visual indication of how to pin like cubiq.org/add-to-home-screen does on iOS. This UI needs to change based on whether I'm in Desktop IE or Metro IE. –  Robert Levy Jun 14 '12 at 19:24
    
Ah right ok. Well in this [link] (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ie/gg491729(v=vs.85).aspx#drag) it shows you how to do a popup that will tell the user to drag the site icon into the taskbar. Not sure what the equivalent would be or if this works in Metro on Windows 8 but worth a try. –  Thomas Morris Jun 14 '12 at 19:29

I tested the following and it works, a jsfiddle showing this can be found here.


This is a bit of long shot, but seems quite a sensible solution:

Why not check whether the browser is full screen1 and depending on that call the fullscreen one metro. I have windows 8 running on my computer at work, so I will try to check tomorrow whether there are any GUI's still around (don't think I remember any) and if so, you would need to manually subtract them. True, it's not the most beautiful solution, but as far as I know there won't be any 'beautiful' solution and this could prove to be a pretty solid hack, as the GUI of metro IE can't be changed with any toolbars or similar software (as far as I know). True, it could lead to a misidentification of the desktop IE, but even that is within reason, as a fullscreen desktop IE will still give a similar experience.


1 Giving something along the lines of:

if(window.innerWidth == screen.width && window.innerHeight == screen.height) {
  // metro
} else {
  // desktop
}
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1  
I just tested, and this code as is does not identify Metro. –  Bert Lamb Jun 19 '12 at 14:19
    
Just tested and this does identify metro. Try opening fiddle.jshell.net/JbGek/2/show/light in metro and in desktop –  David Mulder Jun 19 '12 at 14:52
    
Hmm...you're right, that does seem to work, not sure why it didn't on my test page, possibly because I was running in an IE compatibility mode. –  Bert Lamb Jun 19 '12 at 15:46
    
In Firefox, the innerHeight of full-screen is one pixel less than screen.height, presumably because the top line of pixels activates the toolbar –  Webveloper Aug 7 '12 at 22:07
1  
interestingly enough opening that in both desktop and metro, both reported "Desktop", maximizing desktop by F11 reported "Metro", so it is unfortunately not reliable... it happens with more than 1 monitor of different sizes! –  jJ' Jan 31 '13 at 17:35

It tried out the code below and it seems to work.
It doesn't catch if the user goes InternetOptions->CustomLevel->ScriptActivexControlsMarkedSafeForScripting=false on you though. If the user does this the code believes it's a Metro/Modern.
Presently I see no way around this by checking OS, FullScreen and whatnot.

isWinModern checks for Metro/Modern.
isWinDesktop checks for Windows as Desktop (=non modern in this case)

The code below is not guaranteed to work.

    function isWin8Modern() {
        if (!!window.ActiveXObject) {
            try {
                !!new window.ActiveXObject('htmlfile');
                return false;
            } catch (exc) {
                return true;
            }
        } else {
            return false;
        }
    }

    function isWinDesktop() {
        if (window.ActiveXObject) {
            try {
                new window.ActiveXObject('htmlfile');
                return true;
            } catch (exc) {
                return false;
            }
        } else {
            return false;
        }
    }
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I spent some time on this and figured out a way. I thought about what is missing from IE10 Metro and only one thing that is documented isn't supported in the Metro UI. The developer tools. Well, those tools have objects in the window object. One of these is "__IE_DEVTOOLBAR_CONSOLE_COMMAND_LINE".

If you do something like

if (window.__IE_DEVTOOLBAR_CONSOLE_COMMAND_LINE)
{
    // In IE 10 Standard UI
}
else
{
    // In IE 10 Metro UI
}

I've tested it in a few different environments and it appears to work most places. The only hiccup I can think of is if the developer tools were somehow disabled on the user's browser.

share|improve this answer
1  
You shouldn't detect for window.__IE_DEVTOOLBAR_CONSOLE_COMMAND_LINE. That is only added once F12 (the developer toolbar) is opened so really it's just testing if F12 has been opened. You would also be relying on an implementation detail of F12 which can change as it is not a standard API. –  Andy Mar 1 '12 at 20:57
    
FYI: In IE11, window.__IE_DEVTOOLBAR_CONSOLE_COMMAND_LINE appears to no longer exist. Instead there is window.__BROWSERTOOLS_CONSOLE , window.__BROWSERTOOLS_CONSOLE_BREAKMODE_INVOKER , and window.__BROWSERTOOLS_DOMEXPLORER_ADDED –  robocat Nov 18 '13 at 23:59

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