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This is a newbie question, but I am having some problems in understanding the apply functions for datasets that are a list of arrays.

This is a example of the data I have and what I am trying to do:

> dataset1=array(data1,dim=c(2,10,5))
> dataset2=array(data2,dim=c(2,10,5))
> dataset3=array(data2,dim=c(2,10,5))
> datasets=list(data1=dataset1,data2=dataset2,data3=dataset3)
> str(datasets)
List of 3
 $ data1: num [1:2, 1:10, 1:5] 0.101 1.192 0.154 0.911 1.889 ...
 $ data2: num [1:2, 1:10, 1:5] 2.84 1.63 1.78 1.24 1.09 ...
 $ data3: num [1:2, 1:10, 1:5] 2.84 1.63 1.78 1.24 1.09 ...

I want to replace all values bellow 1.5 by 0

for (d in 1:3){
  for (n in 1:2){
    for (i in 1:10){
      datasets[[d]][n,i,][datasets[[d]][n,i,]<=1.5]=0
    }
  }
}

I wonder if I can I use one of the apply functions? Or for this type of dataset (list of arrays) or should I keep the loop method and forget about other options?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

With reproducible data:

dataset1 = array(rnorm(100),dim = c(2,10,5))
dataset2 = array(rnorm(100),dim = c(2,10,5))
dataset3 = array(rnorm(100),dim = c(2,10,5))
datasets = list(data1 = dataset1, data2 = dataset2, data3 = dataset3)

Now write an anonymous function to do the general replacement, and lapply with that across the list:

datasets.updated <- lapply(datasets, function(x) {x[x < 1.5] <- 0; x})

A rather tidier approach for the anonymous function, provided by dickoa:

datasets.updated <- lapply(datasets, function(x) ifelse(x < 1.5, 0, x))
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1  
I'm not a big fan of ";" using R, but it works. So i'll just add this solution using "ifelse" : lapply(datasets, function(x) ifelse(x < 1.5, 0, x)). –  dickoa Jan 6 '12 at 9:46
    
why don't you like to use ";". is it for a specific resaon? –  A.R Jan 6 '12 at 11:07
    
here it's just syntax, with a semi-colon I can push it all on one line, it's just lazy - far better to put anonymous functions in a better layout, but that somehow means they should not be anonymous (to me). ifelse is a nice tidy up. –  mdsumner Jan 6 '12 at 13:40
    
@A.R: no specific reason....it's really subjective. –  dickoa Jan 6 '12 at 20:10
3  
Note that mdsumner's original anonymous function is much faster with large datasets (I used dataset1 = array(rnorm(100000000),dim = c(200,1000,500)), etc, and the result was about 6.8 times faster than using ifelse). –  naught101 Jun 26 '12 at 6:31

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