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I want to parse stdin text, and fetch to structured data container object. I confuse every time and finally I use global variables, ARGF, each and split. How can I do this better? How can I write easier and read easier? Or what gem does help me?

Below is one case of my ugly code:

# encoding: utf-8
$DATA = {}
$COUNT = 0

ARGF.each do |line|
  col = line.split(nil).map(&:to_i)
  if col.count == 1
    next
  elsif col.count == 2
    $DATA[$COUNT][:cut_param] << { :cut_order => col[0], :pick_count => col[1] }
  elsif col.count == 3
    $COUNT += 1
    $DATA[$COUNT] = {
      :card_amount  => col[0],
      :cut_count    => col[1],
      :needle_order => col[2],
      :cut_param    => []
    }
  end
end
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1  
What's so wrong here? Would you prefer to write code that is easier to integrate into larger tools without requiring every tool to be executed on its own? This seems fine to me. –  sarnold Jan 6 '12 at 0:49
2  
Do you really need the nil parameter to split? –  Mark Thomas Jan 6 '12 at 2:59
    
If you want help formatting your data, you need to supply a data sample you are trying to parse. Also, what would your code do if it found a line with four or more columns? –  the Tin Man Jan 6 '12 at 4:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What you've got is not too bad. Perhaps I'd do two things

  • use a case statement instead of the elsif's
  • append to an array rather than using a hash with a numeric key and having to increment the count manually.

Code:

@data = []

ARGF.each do |line|
  col = line.split.map(&:to_i)
  case col.count
  when 3
    @data << {
      :card_amount  => col[0],
      :cut_count    => col[1],
      :needle_order => col[2],
      :cut_param    => []
    }
  when 2
    @data.last[:cut_param] << { :cut_order => col[0], :pick_count => col[1] }
  end
end
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+1 Nice summarization of the code. I like that you caught the fact that only 2 and 3 columns are significant. –  the Tin Man Jan 6 '12 at 5:02

How about something like this instead? Enable modularity and add more structure to the output. (Might want to put OrderData inside the DataParser module too...)

# encoding: utf-8

class OrderData < Struct.new(:card_amount, :cut_count, :needle_order, :cut_param)
  # Maybe add functionality if needed (existence checking?)
end

module DataParser
  def parse(lines)
    # Die if we get invalid arguments
    if lines.nil? || lines.length == 0 || !(lines.is_a? Array)
      raise ArgumentError, "DataParser::parse Requires a single Array parameter."
    end

    # Collect up our structured output
    output = []

    # Iterate over the input array structuring each result
    lines.each do |line|
      col = line.split.map(&:to_i)
      if col.count == 1
        next
      elsif col.count == 2
        output.last.cut_param << { :cut_order => col[0], :pick_count => col[1] }
      elsif col.count == 3
        output.push(OrderData.new(
          :card_amount  => col[0],
          :cut_count    => col[1],
          :needle_order => col[2],
          :cut_param    => []
        ))
      end
    end
    # Explictly return the output variable instead of the output of the lines
    # array interation.
    return output
  end
end

# If we're run directly, use the command line input for processing
if __FILE__ == $0
  order_data = DataParser::parse(ARGV)
  puts order_data
end
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