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I have a series of objects that I have mapped into a database with LINQ to SQL. The tables are highly normalized. I'm going to abstract my problem. I have five central entities that I have implemented in the database. I then have a series of other objects which I want to implement one or all of these five entities.

Suppose I am implementing a sort of stadium class (think sports teams). These five entities are the five major sports; Baseball, Basketball, Football, Hockey, Soccer. I want to explicitly implement a class for each stadium.

This is an example, Yankee Stadium has hosted Baseball, Hockey and Football games. I want it to implement each of those 3 interfaces. The StadiumBaseClass is my abstract base class that interfaces with my database. The StadiumBaseClass implements all 5 major sports interfaces. I don't want to have the same code for implementing the IBaseball interface in all possible stadiums, I want it to be implemented once in StadiumBaseClass.

I this example, I only want to implement 3, is this the best way of doing this? Its sort of singletonish, but not quite?

class YankeeStadium : IBaseball, IHockey, IFootball
{
    StadiumBaseClass _Stadium {get; set;}

   // IBaseball
   public IBaseball.Whatever {get { return _Stadium.Baseball;} }

   // IFootball
   public IFootball.Whatever {get { return _Stadium.Hockey;} }

  // IHockey
   public IHockey.Whatever {get { return _Stadium.Hockey;} }
}  
share|improve this question
    
Can you read up on the Abstract Factory Pattern and see if that is similar to what you need. –  Daryl Teo Jan 6 '12 at 0:57
    
So is StadiumBaseClass your "abstract base class" as your description says, or a data object that all stadiums encapsulate, as your code shows? –  dasblinkenlight Jan 6 '12 at 1:23
    
Are you C# 4.0 or pre-4.0? –  dasblinkenlight Jan 6 '12 at 1:36
    
@dasblinkenlight: C# 4.0 and its a data object that interfaces with the database tables that contain the interface data. It probably has to be concrete for my example to make sense. –  Mark Jan 6 '12 at 1:41
    
Generally, interfaces indicate a 'is-a' relationship, and properties indicate a 'has-a' relationship. In your case, it's easier to indicate that stadiums have baseball info, rather than stadiums being baseball-hosts. Just add properties for baseball info, hockey info, etc. –  Steve Cooper Jan 6 '12 at 13:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here's an alternative approach (we have used something similar, but not sure how well it will correspond with your linq implementation):

Have StadiumBaseClass implement each of the interfaces with base functionality, then expose virtual properties that the implementing classes can use to a) indicate which interfaces it supports and b) alter the default behavior as needed.

For example, assuming the following interfaces:

    public interface IBaseball
    {
        void Whatever();
    }
    public interface IHockey
    {
        void Whatever();
    }
    public interface IFootball
    {
        void Whatever();
    }
    public interface IBasketball
    {
        void Whatever();
    }
    public interface ISoccer
    {
        void Whatever();
    }

Your base class would look something like:

    public class StadiumBaseClass : IBaseball, IBasketball, IHockey, IFootball, ISoccer
    {

        #region IBaseball Members

        public virtual bool IBaseballImplemented
        {
            get
            {
                return false;
            }
        }

        void IBaseball.Whatever()
        {
            // Do something
        }

        #endregion

        #region IBasketball Members

        public virtual bool IBasketballImplemented
        {
            get
            {
                return false;
            }
        }

        void IBasketball.Whatever()
        {
            // Do something
        }

        #endregion

        #region IHockey Members

        public virtual bool IHockeyImplemented
        {
            get
            {
                return false;
            }
        }

        void IHockey.Whatever()
        {
            // Do something
        }

        #endregion

        #region IFootball Members

        public virtual bool IFootballImplemented
        {
            get
            {
                return false;
            }
        }

        void IFootball.Whatever()
        {
            // Do something
        }

        #endregion

        #region ISoccer Members

        public virtual bool ISoccerImplemented
        {
            get
            {
                return false;
            }
        }

        void ISoccer.Whatever()
        {
            // Do something
        }

        #endregion
    }

Which would leave your individual stadium class as:

    class YankeeStadium : StadiumBaseClass
    {
        public override bool  IBaseballImplemented
        {
            get 
            { 
                return true;
            }
        }
        public override bool IHockeyImplemented
        {
            get
            {
                return true;
            }
        }
        public override bool IFootballImplemented
        {
            get
            {
                return true;
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I would have to cast to the interface inorder to call the Whatever() method. –  Mark Jan 6 '12 at 1:49
    
Yes, with the inherited class, but you could also expose selected interface methods as concrete methods in the base class should the inheriting class need them. The upside is that this method allows you to eliminate the redundant return of the base class data from the inheriting class that you showed in your question. That code would be implemented directly in stadiumbaseclass and wouldn't have to be repeated in its inheritors. –  competent_tech Jan 6 '12 at 2:01
    
It sure would be helpful if downvoters would explain their logic. Downvoting without explanation is not helpful for anyone and, quite frankly, cowardly. –  competent_tech Jan 6 '12 at 18:21

I don't think you should be using inheritance at all. Instead of a YankeeStadium class you should have a Stadium class with a name property.

Likewise you should have a properties such as HasHockey OR simply have the Hockey property return null if it isn't applicable.

share|improve this answer
    
There is no inheritance in my example...I can do if (object is IHockey) to determine if the stadium has Hockey information. I don't have to have a property. –  Mark Jan 6 '12 at 1:45

This seems to be a variation on a common object oriented modelling problem - in the past, I've seen it posed as a problem modelling an educational institution, where a given Person may be one or more of Student, Tutor, Lecturer, Marker, Researcher, etc.

The best solution I've seen is the one proposed by Peter Coad and Jeff De Luca as the Nebulon Archetypal Domain Shape, also known as Color Modelling.

In your situation, the actual stadiums would be your Places. Since you want to explicitly implement each stadium as a class, each one would represent the actual physical stadium. Having a common abstract base class might be helpful. Properties on the class would describe physical attributes of the stadium - such as it's actual address, and so on.

Each of the different sports you want to support (you listed Baseball, Basketball, Football, Hockey, and Soccer) would be implemented as a Role class, say BaseballStadium, BasketballStadium, FootballStadium, HockeyStadium and SoccerStadium. Properties on the class would describe the specific characteristics with respect to hosting that particular sport (seating capacity might vary, for example, from one sport to another).

share|improve this answer
    
I would also recommend decoupling the Data Access Layer from the Business Layer. If the business logic is rather abstract and the db entities are highly normalized, trying to unite the DAL and the BL will most probably end in a code mess. –  Pavel Gatilov Jan 6 '12 at 1:57
    
I intend/have already separated the data from the Business Layer. –  Mark Jan 6 '12 at 4:12

I'd suggest simply having properties on each stadium for each sport, so you could call

Stadium.Baseball.Fixtures
Stadium.Hockey.Teams

When a particular stadium doesn't allow a sport, return a Null Object which for that sport;

eg

iceRink.Baseball.Available // false
iceRink.Baseball.Fixtures // the empty list

This way should help you avoid the problems of multiple inheritance, and particularly, code like

((IBaseball)stadium).Fixtures
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I think that you should take a step back and have a look at some of the gang of four patterns. This is exactly the situation they are designed to show solutions for. I recommend you start looking at the visitor pattern. The vistior pattern enables lots of items (in your case stadiums) to have common behaviors executed across them. See here: http://www.dofactory.com/Patterns/PatternVisitor.aspx

A list of the gang of four patterns are here: http://www.dofactory.com/Patterns/Patterns.aspx

Possibly someone else might suggest another pattern to have a look at. Possibly a decorator pattern looks promising too. (I haven't used a decarator pattern before). I think ultimately you shouldn't be fighting OO, but rather looking for the published solutions to your likely common scenario.

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