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This is driving me crazy. I want to read from a subdirectory (./method/CoyoteAdapter.java.tk.method.514.5.533.5.bk), but my code crashes at fscan (Bus error):

void readFrag( int **sequence, int& nTokens, char* fragName )
{
    FILE *file;
    char tmp[200];

    strncpy(tmp, &fragName[2], 198);

    char szWorkingDirectory[PATH_MAX];
    szWorkingDirectory[0] = '\0';
    getwd(szWorkingDirectory);

    printf("Attempting to open %s/%s\n", szWorkingDirectory, tmp);
    file = fopen(tmp, "r");

    nTokens = 0;
    fscanf(file, "%d", &(*sequence)[nTokens]);

    while(!feof (file))
    {
        fscanf(file, "%d", &(*sequence)[nTokens]);
        ++nTokens;
    }

    fclose(file);
}

// maxFragSizes: Each block has its max frag size
void init( int **seq, int& seqSize, int **sub, int& subSize, int **problemSizesPerBlock, char* fragListName )
{
    FILE *file;
    char line[200];

    int* tokens = new int[THREADS_PER_BLOCK-1]; 
    int nTokens = 0;

    file = fopen(fragListName, "rt");

    while(fgets(line, 200, file) != NULL)
    {
        readFrag( &(*seq), nTokens, line ); 
    }

    fclose(file);

}

However, if I copy the file to my directory, it works. I'm on UNIX (Mac OS). Please help!

Edit: I added the following code, as suggested. The output it ok, but it still doesn't work...

share|improve this question
    
What exactly is the "t" supposed to do in fopen? –  Chris Jan 6 '12 at 1:37
    
"t" text mode file io. –  AVD Jan 6 '12 at 1:37
    
I scoured my man page and I don't see that option. Is it some weird extension? I thought text mode was specified by not including "b" (sorry OP, not trying to hijack your thread here) –  Chris Jan 6 '12 at 1:40
    
Does fragName contain the path to the subdirectory where the file is? –  Daniel Fischer Jan 6 '12 at 1:40
    
@AVD: I can't find any mention of t in either my system's default fopen(3) manpage nor my IEEE-supplied fopen(3posix) manpage. (of course, b is supposed to be a no-op on POSIX-compliant platforms, it is just included for compliance with ISO C.) –  sarnold Jan 6 '12 at 1:50

4 Answers 4

You must have to verify the file pointer. May be file is not found or you don't have sufficient privileges to read it.

 file = fopen(fragName, "rt");
 if(file==NULL)
 {
    printf("\nFile not found");
    return 0;
  }
 fscanf(file, "%d", &tmp);
share|improve this answer
    
Well, it's a void function so returning 0 won't work but the underlying idea is sound so +1. –  paxdiablo Jan 6 '12 at 1:44
4  
Oh please, not a "File not found", there are a half-dozen reasons why the file couldn't be opened, and perror(3) will show you the right reason just as easily: perror("Error reading fragment file in readFrag"); –  sarnold Jan 6 '12 at 1:45
    
No, it's not a permissions issue... –  omegatai Jan 6 '12 at 1:47
1  
@mieli, don't just put that forward as a given. Explain how you discovered it's not a permissions problem. In any case, checking the return from fopen is still a good idea since permissions problems are only one of the reasons it may fail. It's quite possible (if you're running in an IDE) that the directory you think you're in is not actually the directory you are in. –  paxdiablo Jan 6 '12 at 1:51
    
well, I chmod 777 -R the whole directory. –  omegatai Jan 6 '12 at 1:52

AVD is almost right -- you need to check your FILE* from fopen(3) to see if you actually opened the file. But his answer (and selbie's similar answer) both neglect the single most important piece of information: why the fopen(3) failed.

Try this:

void readFrag( char* fragName )
{
    FILE *file;
    int tmp;

    file = fopen(fragName, "r");
    if (!file) {
        perror("Error reading fragment file in readFrag");
        return;
    }
    fscanf(file, "%d", &tmp);
}

I also removed the t from the mode as I can't find any documentation anywhere that supports its use. I hope that this isn't the cause of the problem -- one would hope the libraries would be a bit more rigorous -- but because it is invalid input it certainly could be at fault. (Check your system's fopen(3) manpage and please correct me if I'm mistaken about your platform.)

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it fails in readFrag. But why?? –  omegatai Jan 6 '12 at 1:59
    
What error message do you get from the perror() call? –  sarnold Jan 6 '12 at 1:59
    
Oh, I see, you've changed the code drastically. Does my replacement code work fine? (Or, another way, did your initial code actually fail?) The new code you've given is so very different; the error could also be in how you have allocated memory for the seq parameter to init(), but you don't show that code... –  sarnold Jan 6 '12 at 2:01
    
I'm not sure if "t" is standard or exists on Unix, but on MSDN, it's documented for the visual c++ cmmpiler as: "t - Open in text (translated) mode. In this mode, CTRL+Z is interpreted as an EOF character on input. In files that are opened for reading/writing by using "a+", fopen checks for a CTRL+Z at the end of the file and removes it, if possible. This is done because using fseek and ftell to move within a file that ends with CTRL+Z may cause fseek to behave incorrectly near the end of the file." –  selbie Jan 6 '12 at 6:39
    
@selbie: excellent, thanks for finding the reference! –  sarnold Jan 6 '12 at 23:53

You aren't checking to see if "file" being returned by fopen() is NULL or not before calling fscanf. That's why you are crashing.

As to how to open a file, you may want to call getcwd (getwd) and print the result to see if you are in the parent directory that you think you are in. You probably don't need the "./" prefix in your file path, but I don't think it hurts.

void readFrag( char* fragName ) 
{ 
    FILE *file; 
    int tmp; 
    char szWorkingDir[PATH_MAX];
    szWorkingDirectory[0] = '\0';
    getwd(szWorkingDirectory);

    printf("Attempting to open %s/%s\n", szWorkingDir, fragName);

    file = fopen(fragName, "rt"); 
    if (file != NULL)
        fscanf(file, "%d", &tmp); 
} 

int main()
{
    readFrag("method/CoyoteAdapter.java.tk.method.514.5.533.5.bk");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You're right. This is the output: /Users/mieli/projects/App2/./method/CoyoteAdapter.java.tk.method.514.5.533.5.bk. –  omegatai Jan 6 '12 at 2:11
    
So I decided to add the following code (see edit). But it still doesn't work, and the output is fine! –  omegatai Jan 6 '12 at 2:12

Mostly likely the value of seq that you're passing in to your init function does not point at a pointer to valid memory (either seq itself is invalid, or *seq is)

share|improve this answer
    
No, that's not the problem. –  omegatai Jan 6 '12 at 2:09

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