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In my header file I have included the std::map and use the appropriate namespace.
One of my members is:

map<unsigned int, double> pT_Spam;

And in my .cpp file I attempt to do something that I have been doing frequently for some time now:

for(map<unsigned int, double>::iterator it=pT_Spam.begin() ; it!=pT_Spam.end() ; it++) {/*code*/}

The above is even mentioned in one the examples of using std::map at cplusplus.com . Even though I have done pretty much the same in other parts of the code which cause no compile errors, on this particular line I get the following error from Cygwin:

error: conversion from `std::_Rb_tree_const_iterator<std::pair<const unsigned int, double> >' to non-scalar type `std::_Rb_tree_iterator<std::pair<const unsigned int, double> >' requested

Which seems rather strange. Any idea what might be wrong? (my header is, of course, included in my .cpp)

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It's complaining that the iterator returned by begin() is a const_iterator, but you're assigning it to an iterator. But I'm not sure why, this looks right to me too. What compiler is this? –  Joe Jan 6 '12 at 1:53
    
begin() seems to be capable of returning non-const iterators as well. I use Cygwin's g++ on windows. –  John Athanasiou Jan 6 '12 at 1:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It would seem that at the scope this loop exists, the map is const. For example, is the loop in a class method declared const, like so?

void method() const // const method
{
    // Do stuff.
}

or passed as a const argument, like this?

void function(const map<unsigned int, double>& pT_Spam)
{
    // Do stuff.
}

If it is, you must use const iterators:

for(map<unsigned int, double>::const_iterator it=pT_Spam.begin() ; it!=pT_Spam.end() ; it++)
{
    /*code*/
}

Or, if you're using C++11, then you should use the auto keyword:

for(auto it=pT_Spam.begin() ; it!=pT_Spam.end(); it++)
{
    /*code*/
}

Since in the case you've shown you must use const iterators, you can't use them to modify the map or the data within it. That's const correctness, and it's a good thing :).

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-.25 for using auto in a way that kills kittens. ;) –  Captain Obvlious Jan 6 '12 at 2:05
    
An alternative is to mark the member as mutable. But don't tell anyone I told you that :-) –  Aaron McDaid Jan 6 '12 at 2:05
    
The method running the loop is indeed const, and that makes me understand why the map is const in it's scope as well. Considering I don't need to edit it in this method, const iterators seem to the answer. –  John Athanasiou Jan 6 '12 at 2:07
    
@Chet Simpson Herb Sutter says my kittens are safe :). –  Liam M Jan 6 '12 at 2:21

Well, the error says you're trying to cast a const_iterator to an iterator. You say that pT_Spam is a member. Is it a member of a const object? If it is, begin() and end() will return const_iterators.

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Not sure to be honest, it's a declared private member of my 'nbclassifier' class, while the method that performs the loop is a member of that class as well. –  John Athanasiou Jan 6 '12 at 2:04
    
An alternative is to mark the member as mutable. But don't tell anyone I told you that :-) –  Aaron McDaid Jan 6 '12 at 2:05
    
Const is coming in somewhere. If the member variable isn't declared const, and if the method isn't declared const, then maybe the method is being called on a const object (which would make the member variable implicitly const). Does the compiler error come with a call stack? EDIT: wait, it would have to be a const method if it's being called on a const object. –  Peter Milley Jan 6 '12 at 2:12

You need to use const_iterators for maps, so it should be:

for(map<unsigned int, double>::const_iterator it = \\and so on

Edit: As pointed out the above is right, but for completely wrong reasons (maps have non-const iterators. What was I thinking exactly? I don't know). Most likely your map is defined as const (as pointed out in another answer).

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1  
Won't that cause issues when altering their value(it++)? Also, I have been using regular iterators for similar loops so far and never had problems. –  John Athanasiou Jan 6 '12 at 1:52
2  
Um, what? map has non-const iterators. –  Peter Milley Jan 6 '12 at 1:54
1  
@JohnAthanasiou: A mutable const-iterator is not the same as a const non-const iterator! Think T const * vs T * const. –  Kerrek SB Jan 6 '12 at 1:58
    
John: const_iterators aren't themselves const, they just refer to a const object. –  Peter Milley Jan 6 '12 at 1:58

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