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In Python, everything has a class. Therefore dict also has a class.

So, in theory, I should be able to change the implementation of the keyvalue assignment behavior.


Example:

d = dict()
d['first'] = 3    # Internally d['first'] is stored as 6 [i.e. value*2 if value is INT]

print d['first']  # should print 6

d['second'] = 4 

print d['second'] # should print 8


I noticed that most objects have attributes listed in OBJECT.__dict__ or vars(OBJECT). But this isn’t the case for dict or list.

How can I get the desired behavior by overriding dict.__setattr__() method?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

It is __setitem__ that have to be overriden in this case - and it is as simples as:

class MyDict(dict):
    def __setitem__(self, key, value):
         dict.__setitem__(self, key, 2 * value)

Example:

>>> m  = MyDict()
>>> m[0] = 5
>>> m
{0: 10}

__setattr__ controls how object attributes themselves (not key/value pairs) are attributed.

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Thanks. This is exactly what I was looking for .... On the same note, can I assume, key and value are attributes in the dict() class. If yes, is there a way to find that out(other than looking at the source code) like vars(object) etc. I ask so that if I wanted to change the behavior of say lists, or tuples. –  amehta Jan 6 '12 at 2:16
    
As the other answers note, you can't change the behavior of the builtin types, like dicts or lists - but you can either subclass then, or create your own classes with ay desired behavior. The best document to read and understand which methods should be implemented for each behavior you want is Python's data model: docs.python.org/reference/datamodel.html . –  jsbueno Jan 6 '12 at 2:48

Be careful when subclassing dict. If you just override __setitem__, then other dict methods, such as update, will not call your __setitem__.

class MyDict(dict):
    def __setitem__(self, key, value):
         dict.__setitem__(self, key, 2 * value)

d = MyDict()
d['first'] = 3
print(d['first'])
# 6

d.update({'first':4})
print(d['first'])
# 4                       # <--- __setitem__ was not called.

In order to create a dict-like object, you either need to subclass dict and override all the methods (see OrderedDict for an example of this approach), or subclass collections.MutableMapping and override a small subset those methods (from which all the other methods are derived).

import collections

class MyDict2(collections.MutableMapping,dict):
    def __getitem__(self, key):
        return dict.__getitem__(self, key)
    def __setitem__(self, key, value):
         dict.__setitem__(self, key, 2 * value)
    def __delitem__(self, key):
        dict.__delitem__(self, key)
    def __iter__(self):
        return dict.__iter__(self)
    def __len__(self):
        return dict.__len__(self)
    def __contains__(self, x):
        return dict.__contains__(self, x)

d = MyDict2()
d['first'] = 3
print(d['first'])
# 6
d.update({'first':4})
print(d['first'])
# 8
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You can’t. The dict class is written in C a Python builtin, which means you can’t really shouldn’t do any kind of monkey-patching on it.

You can, however, inherit from it and override whatever methods you want in your subclass.

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Well, it's safer to say that dict is a built-in and that's why you can't change it. Implementation doesn't have to be CPython. –  Cat Plus Plus Jan 6 '12 at 1:52
    
Very true, yes -- I made an assumption that this is CPython. I have absolutely no idea if Jython or Iron Python and the likes would let you do this. However since CPython is kind of the "gold standard" I'm guessing that writing code with varying behavior is, at the least, undesirable. So it would be best not to do this. –  Chris Jan 6 '12 at 1:53
    
Thanks. I don't plan to do any such thing, just trying to understand the internals :) –  amehta Jan 6 '12 at 2:17

If you run the following code in the console you will see that the dict class/object is read-only:

{}.__setitem__ = None
AttributeError: 'dict' object attribute '__setitem__' is read-only

You need to what @jsbueno posted, which is create a subclass of the dict class, override the __setitem__ method, multiply the value by two and then call the original dict __setitem__ method.

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