Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

following excerpted from here

pw = (widget *)malloc(sizeof(widget));

allocates raw storage. Indeed, the malloc call allocates storage that's big enough and suitably aligned to hold an object of type widget

also see fast pImpl from herb sutter, he said:

Alignment. Any memory Alignment. Any memory that's allocated dynamically via new or malloc is guaranteed to be properly aligned for objects of any type, but buffers that are not allocated dynamically have no such guarantee

I am curious about this, how does malloc know alignment of the custom type?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Alignment requirements are recursive: The alignment of any struct is simply the largest alignment of any of its members, and this is understood recursively.

For example, and assuming that each fundamental type's alignment equals its size (this is not always true in general), the struct X { int; char; double; } has the alignment of double, and it will be padded to be a multiple of the size of double (e.g. 4 (int), 1 (char), 3 (padding), 8 (double)). The struct Y { int; X; float; } has the alignment of X, which is the largest and equal to the alignment of double, and Y is laid out accordingly: 4 (int), 4 (padding), 16 (X), 4 (float), 4 (padding).

(All numbers are just examples and could differ on your machine.)

Therefore, by breaking it down to the fundamental types, we only need to know a handful of fundamental alignments, and among those there is a well-known largest. C++ even defines a type maxalign_t (I think) whose alignment is that largest alignment.

All malloc() needs to do is to pick an address that's a multiple of that value.

share|improve this answer
1  
The key thing to point out is that this doesn't include custom align directives to the compiler that might over-align data. –  Mehrdad Aug 28 '13 at 4:55
1  
Although if you use these you are already outside the scope of the standard, please note that memory allocated in this way probably won't meet the alignment requirements for built types such as _m256 that are available as extensions on some platforms. –  jcoder Aug 28 '13 at 7:25

I think the most relevant part of the Herb Sutter quote is the part I've marked in bold:

Alignment. Any memory Alignment. Any memory that's allocated dynamically via new or malloc is guaranteed to be properly aligned for objects of any type, but buffers that are not allocated dynamically have no such guarantee

It doesn't have to know what type you have in mind, because it's aligning for any type. On any given system, there's a maximum alignment size that's ever necessary or meaningful; for example, a system with four-byte words will likely have a maximum of four-byte alignment.

This is also made clear by the malloc(3) man-page, which says in part:

The malloc() and calloc() functions return a pointer to the allocated memory that is suitably aligned for any kind of variable.

share|improve this answer
2  
what is meaning of any kind of variable? it does't answer my question. does it mean malloc will always use maximum alignment size in any given system, right? –  Chang Jan 6 '12 at 2:29
2  
@Chang: effectively, yes. Also note, the quote is wrong. new is only guaranteed to have "any" alignment when allocating char or unsigned char. For others, it may have a smaller alignment. –  Mooing Duck Jan 6 '12 at 2:33
    
@Chang: Right, the maximum alignment size. "Suitably aligned for any kind of variable" means "suitably aligned for an int and suitably aligned for a pointer and suitably aligned for any struct and . . .". –  ruakh Jan 6 '12 at 2:35
    
@MooingDuck: new char[16] does not guarantee any alignment at all. (In general, new T[n] returns a pointer aligned for any type X where sizeof(X)<=sizeof(T).) –  aschepler Aug 28 '13 at 5:14
1  
@aschepler: That's not true. See the C++11 spec, section 5.3.4, clause 10; new char[16] is specified in a way that's assumed to guarantee that it's suitably aligned for any type X where sizeof(X)<=16. –  ruakh Aug 28 '13 at 5:33

The only information that malloc() can use is the size of the request passed to it. In general, it might do something like round up the passed size to the nearest greater (or equal) power of two, and align the memory based on that value. There would likely also be an upper bound on the alignment value, such as 8 bytes.

The above is a hypothetical discussion, and the actual implementation depends on the machine architecture and runtime library that you're using. Maybe your malloc() always returns blocks aligned on 8 bytes and it never has to do anything different.

share|improve this answer
    
In summary then, malloc uses the 'worst case' alignment because it doesn't know any better. Does that mean that calloc can be smarter because it takes two args, the number of objects and the size of a single object? –  Aaron McDaid Jan 6 '12 at 2:15
    
Maybe. Maybe not. You'd have to look at your runtime library source to find out. –  Greg Hewgill Jan 6 '12 at 2:16
1  
-1, sorry. Your answer includes the truth, but it also includes disinformation. It's not a "maybe, maybe not" thing; it's specifically documented to work in a way that doesn't depend on the size. (Dunno why not, though. It seems like it would make perfect sense for it to do so.) –  ruakh Jan 6 '12 at 2:18
    
The answer to my own question is No. I found this: "The malloc() and calloc() functions return a pointer to the allocated memory that is suitably aligned for any kind of variable." Seem like the memalign function is potentially useful though: wwwcgi.rdg.ac.uk:8081/cgi-bin/cgiwrap/wsi14/poplog/man/3C/… –  Aaron McDaid Jan 6 '12 at 2:22
    
see ruakh's reply, so malloc will always use maximum alignment size in any given system, right? –  Chang Jan 6 '12 at 2:26

1) Align to the least common multiple of all alignments. e.g. if ints require 4 byte alignment, but pointers require 8, then allocate everything to 8 byte alignment. This causes everything to be aligned.

2) Use the size argument to determine correct alignment. For small sizes you can infer the type, such as malloc(1) (assuming other types sizes are not 1) is always a char. C++ new has the benefit of being type safe and so can always make alignment decisions this way.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you expand the acronym LCM? I can guess, but I shouldn't have to. –  Mooing Duck Jan 6 '12 at 2:34
    
Also, there are other types in C++ that can be 1 byte. However, your implication is correct, it can still align based of the size of the type. –  Mooing Duck Jan 6 '12 at 2:36

Previous to C++11 alignment was treated fairly simple by using the largest alignment where exact value was unknown and malloc/calloc still work this way. This means malloc allocation is correctly aligned for any type.

Wrong alignment may result in undefined behavior according to the standard but I have seen x86 compilers being generous and only punishing with lower performance.

Note that you also can tweak alignment via compiler options or directives. (pragma pack for VisualStudio for example).

But when it comes to placement new, then C++11 brings us new keywords called alignof and alignas. Here is some code which shows the effect if compiler max alignment is greater then 1. The first placement new below is automatically good but not the second.

#include <iostream>
#include <malloc.h>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
        struct A { char c; };
        struct B { int i; char c; };

        unsigned char * buffer = (unsigned char *)malloc(1000000);
        long mp = (long)buffer;

        // First placment new
        long alignofA = alignof(A) - 1;
        cout << "alignment of A: " << std::hex << (alignofA + 1) << endl;
        cout << "placement address before alignment: " << std::hex << mp << endl;
        if (mp&alignofA)
        {
            mp |= alignofA;
            ++mp;
        }
        cout << "placement address after alignment : " << std::hex <<mp << endl;
        A * a = new((unsigned char *)mp)A;
        mp += sizeof(A);

        // Second placment new
        long alignofB = alignof(B) - 1;
        cout << "alignment of B: " <<  std::hex << (alignofB + 1) << endl;
        cout << "placement address before alignment: " << std::hex << mp << endl;
        if (mp&alignofB)
        {
            mp |= alignofB;
            ++mp;
        }
        cout << "placement address after alignment : " << std::hex << mp << endl;
        B * b = new((unsigned char *)mp)B;
        mp += sizeof(B);
}

I guess performance of this code can be improved with some bitwise operations.

EDIT: Replaced expensive modulo computation with bitwise operations. Still hoping that somebody finds something even faster.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not actually the compiler, it's the hardware itself. On x86 a misaligned memory access simply forces the processor to fetch the two sides of the memory boundary and piece the result together, so it's always "correct" if slower. On e.g. some ARM processors, you would get a bus error and a program crash. This is a bit of a problem because many programmers are never exposed to anything else than x86, and so may not know that the behaviour is actually undefined instead of merely decreasing performance. –  Thomas Sep 6 '14 at 15:29
    
You are correct, its the hardware or cpu-microcode software but not the actual compiler that saves you on the x86 architecture. I really wonder why there is no more convenient api to handle this. As if C/C++ designers wanted developers to step into the trap. Reminds me of std::numeric_limits<double>::min() trap. Anyone got that one right the first time? –  Patrick Fromberg Sep 6 '14 at 23:56
    
Well, once you know what is going on, it's not too hard to change your programming style from all sorts of crazy type-punning to well-typed code, fortunately. The C type system makes it fairly easy to preserve type alignment as long as you don't go doing insane bit manipulation stuff without paying attention. Now pointer-aliasing-free code on the other hand has some much tougher semantics... –  Thomas Sep 7 '14 at 12:39
    
I do not understand. You have the problem whenever you have your own little heap that you manage yourself. What use of placement new are you thinking about in your comment? –  Patrick Fromberg Sep 7 '14 at 14:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.