Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a vector template with a few specializations so that there are named accessors for the first few items of the vector (such x, y, z, w) depending on the size. KennyTM's answer was a great help with this. I also added a form of Curiously recurring template pattern to be able to use the operators naturally. Here is the base class and a specialization with added functions (omitted most member implementations for brevity):

template<int Dim, typename V, typename ItemType = float>
class VectorImpl
{
public:
    typedef ItemType value_type;    
    VectorImpl() { elements.fill(0); }    
    VectorImpl(std::initializer_list<ItemType> init_list);

        V operator+(const V& other)
    {
        V result;
        for (int i = 0; i < Dim; ++i) 
            result.elements[i] = elements[i] + other.elements[i];

        return result;
    }

    QString toString();    
        // ... other members ...

protected:
    VectorImpl(const VectorImpl& other) = default;

protected:
    std::array<ItemType, Dim> elements;
};

template<int Dim, typename ItemType = float>
class Vector : public VectorImpl<Dim, Vector<Dim, ItemType>, ItemType>
{
    typedef VectorImpl<Dim, Vector<Dim, ItemType>, ItemType> ParentType;
public:
    Vector() : ParentType() {}
    Vector(const ParentType& other) : ParentType(other) {}
    Vector(std::initializer_list<ItemType> init_list) : ParentType(init_list) {}
};

template<typename ItemType>
class Vector<3, ItemType> : public VectorImpl<3, Vector<3, ItemType>, ItemType>
{
    typedef VectorImpl<3, Vector<3, ItemType>, ItemType> ParentType;
public:
    Vector() : ParentType() {}
    Vector(const ParentType& other) : ParentType(other) {}
    Vector(std::initializer_list<ItemType> init_list) : ParentType(init_list) {}
    ItemType x() const { return this->elements[0]; }
    ItemType y() const { return this->elements[1]; }
    ItemType z() const { return this->elements[2]; }
};

And I wanted to add qDebug()<< support, so I did this:

template<int Dim, typename ItemType>
QDebug operator<<(QDebug dbg, Vector<Dim, ItemType>& v)
{
    dbg.nospace() << v.toString();
    return dbg.space();
}

Now, the following code compiles and works:

Vector<3> v1 = { 3,4,5 };
qDebug() << v1;

This one does, too:

Vector<3> v1 = { 3,4,5 };
Vector<3> v2 = { 1,-1,1 };
qDebug() << v1;
auto v3 = v1 + v2;
qDebug() << v3;

But this one does not:

Vector<3> v1 = { 3,4,5 };
Vector<3> v2 = { 1,-1,1 };
qDebug() << (v1 + v2);

The compiler says:

error: no match for 'operator<<' in 'qDebug()() << v1.Vector<3>::.VectorImpl::operator+ [with int Dim = 3, V = Vector<3>, ItemType = float]((*(const Vector<3>*)(& v2)))'

What is going on? Why is the type of v1 + v2 different when assigning to a variable? What should I do to make this compile?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Give the output function a const reference, or rvalues (such as the temporary that is the result of your addition) won't bind to it (and nor will actual constants, for that matter):

QDebug operator<<(QDebug dbg, Vector<Dim, ItemType> const & v)
//                                                  ^^^^^

Also declare toString as const:

QString toString() const;
//                 ^^^^^
share|improve this answer
    
I feel like this problem (not making reference const) comes out a lot on SO. –  Jesse Good Jan 6 '12 at 2:24
    
I can't believe I missed that... thanks! –  Tamás Szelei Jan 6 '12 at 2:24
    
@TamásSzelei: Happens to the best... :-) –  Kerrek SB Jan 6 '12 at 2:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.