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In the following code, I'd expect the output to be

B
C

But frustratingly enough it is

A
C

Is there something I can do to make it behave the way I was expecting? And why is this behavior happening in the first place?
I've resigned myself to defining mixin templates of stuff and mixing it in to every class that overrides write, which fixes the problem but is an ugly hack IMO.

import std.stdio : writeln;

class A {
    void write() {
        stuff();
    }

    void stuff()() {
        writeln("A");
    }
}


class B : A {
    void stuff()() {
        writeln("B");
    }
}

class C : A {
    void write() {
        stuff();
    }

    void stuff()() {
        writeln("C");
    }

}

void main (string[] args) {
    B b = new B();
    b.write();
    C c = new C();
    c.write();
}
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1  
In stuff()(), the first set of brackets would contain template parameters, in this case they're empty but it still counts. I'm also using syntactic sugar to call it as b.stuff() as opposed to the full b.stuff!()() –  Jean-Bernard Pellerin Jan 6 '12 at 2:56
    
(Thanks @Jean, I've deleted my original comment as it was totally off the wall. I think I new about D templates once, but I've forgotten it all!) –  Aaron McDaid Jan 6 '12 at 3:00
    
Well, the trick of making a function a template by adding empty template parameters probably doesn't occur to most people. Its primary use is getting around the bug that disallows overloading templated functions with non-templated functions. So, in the long run, it probably won't be a particularly useful feature. –  Jonathan M Davis Jan 6 '12 at 3:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To quote the online documentation,

Tem­plates can­not be used to add non-sta­tic mem­bers or vir­tual func­tions to classes.

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ah thank you, I didn't see that. Is it then acceptable to have a mixin template defining stuff inside it, and mixing that template into every subclass to achieve "virtualness"? It's the solution I've found so far, but it just doesn't sit right with me. –  Jean-Bernard Pellerin Jan 6 '12 at 2:54
1  
You wouldn't be getting an "virtualness" at all that way. The implementation would depend entirely on what the reference type was rather than the actual type of the object. You can add stuff to a base class with templates. You just can't override it. You could have a templated function know about all of the derived classes, determine what the actual object type was via casting at runtime, and then use a particular implementation for it, but that's just plain ugly. But what's ultimately "acceptable" is up to you and whoever has to deal with your code. –  Jonathan M Davis Jan 6 '12 at 3:02
    
oops, the way I mean "virtualness" is that the template function uses string mixins to modify class variables. If it is defined in the base class and subclasses have different class variables then it will fail to compile those statements. The template mixin solves this because it's context is now the subclass and it has access to those new variables. You can see what I mean here: codereview.stackexchange.com/q/7438/8619 –  Jean-Bernard Pellerin Jan 6 '12 at 3:12
    
That approach seems at least somewhat reasonable. My natural reaction would be to try and find a cleaner way of doing it, but if you actually need classes with templated functions whose behavior changes in derived classes, your options are limited. –  Jonathan M Davis Jan 6 '12 at 3:28

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