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i have created to rotating wrings and places them on the stage which both rotate it works fin but just wanted to know if this is a correct way of doing it or is there a more simple way

glPushMatrix();
    glColor3ub(0,0,255);
    glTranslatef(110.0f,30.0f,-30.0f);
    glRotatef(torusRotation1,0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f);
    glutSolidTorus(5.0, 30.0, 50, 50);

    torusRotation1+= -1.0f;

    if(torusRotation1 > 360.0f)
    {
        torusRotation1 = 0.0f;
    }
    glPopMatrix();

    glPushMatrix();
    glColor3ub(0,0,255);
    glTranslatef(80.0f,-80.0f,0.0f);
    glRotatef(torusRotation2,0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f);
    glutSolidTorus(5.0, 30.0, 50, 50);

    torusRotation2+= 1.0f;

    if(torusRotation2 > 360.0f)
    {
        torusRotation2 = 0.0f;
    }
    glPopMatrix();
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First off: you are aware that you are using a deprecated OpenGL commands, correct? I know that for the purposes of learning OpenGL 1/2 are fine, but you should still be aware of what features are deprecated (matrix stack and I think glut uses immediate mode).

Assuming that you are doing this purely for educational purposes: if it stays that simple then it's fine but if it's part of a bigger program then you should probably generalize.

For clarity you could put that code into a function e.g.:

drawRing(GLfloat px,GLfloat py,GLfloat pz,GLfloat &rotation)
{
    glPushMatrix();
    glColor3ub(0,0,255);
    glTranslatef(px,py,pz);
    glRotatef(rotation,0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f);
    glutSolidTorus(5.0, 30.0, 50, 50);

    rotation+= -1.0f;

    if(rotation > 360.0f)
    {
        rotation = 0.0f;
    }
    glPopMatrix();
}

but be aware that you change the rotation value inside that function. Also all those hard-coded values (colors, positions, sizes, vectors) are imo only tolerable in test programs. For bigger projects a scene description format should be used.

But for bigger scenes with a bunch of elements a scenegraph structure is very recommended. Also if it get to that territory then you should decouple the animation speed from the draw time and introduce a tick() function that updates the animations relative tot the time that has passed. If you are taking it that far then you might as well port it to a more modern version of OpenGL.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer PeterT –  Led Jan 6 '12 at 3:50
    
I have seen many people comment that commands are deprecated, however I have not been able to find the 4.2 ones. Is this it? opengl.org/sdk/docs/man4 –  Fabián Heredia Montiel Jan 8 '12 at 5:26
    
Im not really sure tbh –  Led Jan 9 '12 at 5:58

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