Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am attempting to split a closed path to sub-paths, the image is of a tree and I want to be able to easily manipulate branches by dividing them from the path between two nodes and then recombining later.

I have tried "Break apart" and "Cut Path" but neither work predictably (annoyingly, it worked for one branch but can't get to to work for others!).

Ideally, I want to cut the path at the base of a branch by selecting the nodes on either side at the base of the branch so that I can rotate and translate that branch independently.

branch nodes

share|improve this question

closed as off topic by Georg Schölly, Roku, Owen S., Spudley, Fls'Zen Apr 29 '13 at 0:09

Questions on Stack Overflow are expected to relate to programming within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Make sure you only selected two nodes : sometimes nodes are so close that that UI displays them as a single one when in fact there are more. I believe that's why your output seems unpredictable. Zoom in as much as you can to distinguish very close nodes. Simplifying your path may help (Ctrl+L) –  user1878583 Dec 5 '12 at 9:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Try this:

  1. Select the two nodes at each side of the base of the branch (as shown in your image).
  2. Use the "Break path at selected nodes"-button. It's located in the upper toolbar visible when you press F2.
  3. Now you have two connected paths which you can separate using Path->"Break Apart".
share|improve this answer
    
This seems to accomplish exactly what you are asking, please accept the answer if it does so. –  Josh McKearin Apr 21 '13 at 5:54

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.