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Can you help me simplify this IF structure? This is javascript like node but something proprietary so ignore the db.execute stuff :)

if(!("Division" in Shipping))
    {
        var shipError = false;
        Shipping.Division = Billing.Division;
        if(!Shipping.Division)
        {
                if(Shipping.PostalCode)
            {
                Shipping.Division = Db.ExecuteScalar("SELECT Code from Location.Division D JOIN Location.PostalCode P ON DivisionId = D.ID AND PostalCode=?", Shipping.PostalCode);
                if(!Shipping.Division) shipError = true;
            }
            else
                shipError = true;
        }

        if(shipError){
                Errors.push({Code : "SHIPPINGDIVISION", Message : "Shipping State Required"});
                Shipping.Division = "";
        }
    }
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why do you want to simplify it? Is it not working well, or is there any obscure bug, performance issue? –  mridkash Jan 6 '12 at 6:13
    
There is no simpler way to make it. –  Big Fat Pig Jan 6 '12 at 6:21
    
@Big I appreciate the humor. –  deceze Jan 6 '12 at 6:23
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Have you tried using google closure?

It is a javascript optimizer. Try it out and see how it optimizes your code, if you like some of the optimizations you can use it in your code.

From the page.

A JavaScript optimizer The Closure Compiler compiles JavaScript into compact, high-performance code. The compiler removes dead code and rewrites and minimizes what's left so that it downloads and runs quickly. It also checks syntax, variable references, and types, and warns about common JavaScript pitfalls. These checks and optimizations help you write apps that are less buggy and easier to maintain. You can use the compiler with Closure Inspector, a Firebug extension that makes debugging the obfuscated code almost as easy as debugging the human-readable source.

The link Google Closure

Your code optimized.

if(!("Division" in Shipping)) {
  var shipError = !1;
  Shipping.Division = Billing.Division;
  if(!Shipping.Division) {
    Shipping.PostalCode ? (Shipping.Division = Db.ExecuteScalar("SELECT Code from    Location.Division D JOIN Location.PostalCode P ON DivisionId = D.ID AND PostalCode=?",  Shipping.PostalCode), Shipping.Division || (shipError = !0)) : shipError = !0
  }
  if(shipError) {
    Errors.push({Code:"SHIPPINGDIVISION", Message:"Shipping State Required"}),      Shipping.Division = ""
  }
}
;
share|improve this answer
    
Don't assume that automatically optimised code is as good as it gets. The answers given by @deceze and me are both just as short, yet both eliminate the shipError variable entirely and both are much easier to read and therefore much more maintainable. The question was about "simplifying", but that line in the middle of the Google Closure version that starts Shipping.PostalCode ? is just silly - yes it does the same thing; doesn't make it right. –  nnnnnn Jan 9 '12 at 6:25
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if (!Shipping.Division) {
    Shipping.Division = Billing.Division;
}
if (!Shipping.Division && Shipping.PostalCode) {
    Shipping.Division = Db.ExecuteScalar(...);
}
if (!Shipping.Division) {
    Errors.push({Code : "SHIPPINGDIVISION", Message : "Shipping State Required"});
}

Read this as:

  • if not shipping division
    • try to take shipping division from billing division
  • if not shipping division but postal code
    • try to get shipping division from postal code
  • if still not shipping division
    • fail
share|improve this answer
    
That's good, but you also need to try to set Shipping.Division to Billing.Division. –  Tikhon Jelvis Jan 6 '12 at 6:23
    
if (!Shipping.Division && !(Shipping.Division = Billing.Division) && Shipping.PostalCode) { ... } would more accurately reflect the original algorithm... –  nnnnnn Jan 6 '12 at 6:24
    
@Tikhon I'm giving an example here, not writing production code. –  deceze Jan 6 '12 at 6:24
    
@nnn This example only includes the if logic, not the pre, post and in-between processing. Clear enough? :) –  deceze Jan 6 '12 at 6:25
    
But it doesn't include all of the if logic, because (as Tikhon also pointed out) there is an additional if after setting Shipping.Division to Billing.Division. I believe if you were to replace your first if with the one from my previous comment then your answer would cover the entire thing including in-between processing. –  nnnnnn Jan 6 '12 at 6:40
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You don't need the shipError variable, you can just test if(!Shipping.Division) again at the end. This lets you eliminate the variable declaration (obviously), but also removes an if and an else that were only there to set shipError = true. Ends up like this:

if(!("Division" in Shipping)) {
   Shipping.Division = Billing.Division;
   if(!Shipping.Division) {
      if(Shipping.PostalCode) {
         Shipping.Division = Db.ExecuteScalar("SELECT statement here",
                                              Shipping.PostalCode);
      }    
   }
   if(!Shipping.Division){
      Errors.push({Code : "SHIPPINGDIVISION", Message : "Shipping State Required"});
      Shipping.Division = "";
   }
} 
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