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I have a recursive type function in Javascript that runs like this:

function loadThumb(thumb) {
    rotate=setTimeout(function() {
        loadThumb(next);
    }, delay);
}

Note: I've simplified the function to make it easier to read.

I have "a" tags called like this

<a href="#" onclick="loadThumb(3); clearTimeout(rotate);">Load thumb 3</a>

However, they don't clearout the timer, the timer continues to cycle through the function irregardless of the clearTimeout() being called.

Any ideas why? I think it might have something to do with a scope problem or something like that.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Yeah, you need to make rotate a global variable. Simply declare it outside the function like so:

var rotate;
var delay = 1000;

function loadThumb(thumb) {
    alert("loading thumb: " + thumb);
    rotate = setTimeout(function() {
        loadThumb(thumb + 1);
    }, delay);
}

Also, you need to make sure you clear the timeout before you call loadThumb. Otherwise you'll clear the timer you just started.

<a href="#" onclick="clearTimeout(rotate); loadThumb(3);">Load thumb 3</a>

fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/63FUD/

share|improve this answer
    
and return false. And not having var rotate should make it a windows scoped var –  mplungjan Jan 6 '12 at 8:35
    
Oh yeah that's what I was doing, by calling it after it was getting things confused, it's working now. Thanks. –  Talon Jan 7 '12 at 0:31

it may be the issue of scope so make rotate as global variable and call clearTimeout(rotate);

refer clearTimeout() example

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It may be a scoping issue if you are not declaring rotate externally.

Try this:

var rotate = 0;
function loadThumb(thumb) {

    rotate=setTimeout(function() {
        loadThumb(next);
    }, delay);

}
share|improve this answer

Return false on the link

Since you are not using var rotate, it should not be a scoping issue since rotate would be in the window scope. Can you show the complete code?

It is considered poor coding to inline the script - you should attach the event handler onload of the page

Also you should not have the setTimeout inside a function that might be called for one image

Try this:

var rotate,next=1;
function loadThumb(thumb) {
  if (thumb) ... use thumb
  else ... use next
}

function slide() {
    rotate=setInterval(function() {
        loadThumb();
        next++; 
        if (next>=images.length) next=0;
    }, delay);
}

window.onload=function() {
  var links = document.getElementsByTagName("a");
  if (links[i].className==="thumbLink") {
    links[i].onclick=function() {
      var idx = this.id.replace("link","");
      loadThumb(idx);
      clearInterval(rotate);
      return false;
    }
  }
  document.getElementById("start").onclick=function() {
    slide();
    return false;
  }
  document.getElementById("stop").onclick=function() {
    clearInterval(rotate);
    return false;
  }
  slide();
}

assuming

<a href="#" id="start">Start</a>
<a href="#" id="stop">Stop</a>

<a href="#" id="link0" class="thumbLink">Show 1</a>
<a href="#" id="link1" class="thumbLink">Show 2</a>
<a href="#" id="link2" class="thumbLink">Show 3</a>
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If you have to manage multiple timeouts, you can use an object in the global scope and some custom methods to create and remove your timeouts. To access the methods you can either put the calls in the onclick handler of your links (like in the example), or use a library like jQuery to bind them.

<script type="text/javascript">
    var timeouts = timeouts || {};

    function createTimeout(name, milliseconds, callback) {
        timeouts.name = setTimeout(callback, milliseconds);
    }

    function removeTimeout(name) {
        if (typeof(timeouts.name) !== undefined) {
            clearTimeout(timeouts.name);
            timeouts.name = undefined;
        }
    }

    createTimeout('foo', 5000, function() {
        alert('timeout')
    });
</script>

i have also posted an example on jsFiddle http://jsfiddle.net/AGpzs/

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I'm not sure what exactly you are doing, because as far as I can see you didn't post all the code, but this looks better for me:

function loadThumb(thumb) {

    return setTimeout(function() {
        loadThumb(next);
    }, delay);

}

and then:

<a href="#" onclick="clearTimeout(loadThumb(3));">Load thumb 3</a>
share|improve this answer
    
Why have javascript: - it is default - and why no return false in the function? –  mplungjan Jan 6 '12 at 8:35
    
While the label javascript: is not wrong there, it is of no use either. You could as well write foo: or bar: or sfgasdga:. Please remove it, as it might make people think it is required. @mplungjan: I would not say it is default. In links (URLs) it is used as kind of protocol so that the browser knows what to do, but on* attributes are always interpreted as JavaScript (maybe that's what you meant, in that case, nvm ;)). –  Felix Kling Jan 6 '12 at 8:58
    
According to me it is not a LABEL, it is to (was used to) tell the browser that the code that is coming is javascript. It is ONLY useful if the browser is IE and the FIRST script on the page is VBScript since that (at least it used to) would set the default language in inline event handlers to VBScript. –  mplungjan Jan 6 '12 at 9:59
    
Thank you for the notes. It's my mistake. Normally I'm placing javascript: when I'm adding something in the href attribute. –  Krasimir Jan 7 '12 at 8:02

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