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After adding two identical objects to a Set, I would expect the set to contain only one element.

public void addIdenticalObjectsToSet(){
    Set<Foo> set = new HashSet<Foo>();
    set.add(new Foo("totoro"));
    set.add(new Foo("totoro"));
    Assert.assertEquals(1, set.size());            // PROBLEM: SIZE=2
}

private class Foo {
    private String id;
    public Foo(String id) {
        this.id = id;
    }
    public String getId() {
        return id;
    }
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        return obj!= null && obj instanceof Foo &&
            ((Foo)obj).getId().equals(this.getId());
    }
    public int hashcode() {
        return this.getId().hashCode();
    }
}

I consider two objects as identical if they have the same id (String).

Other strange thing: Neither Foo.equals nor Foo.hashcode are accessed, as far as I can tell using debug/breakpoints. What am I missing?

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2  
try to use @Override anotation –  narek.gevorgyan Jan 6 '12 at 8:23
2  
Try applying @Override on the methods which you think are overridden –  denis.solonenko Jan 6 '12 at 8:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 15 down vote accepted
public int hashcode() {
        return this.getId().hashCode();
    }

should be

@Override
public int hashCode() {
        return this.getId().hashCode();
    }

The annotation would have told you about the spelling mistake.

There should also be a (missing) little triangle symbol in your IDE on the method to indicate if an interface is being implemented or a parent method overridden.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: Similar to using compareto instead of compareTo. There is a hashcode method in the Java 6 JDK ;) –  Peter Lawrey Jan 6 '12 at 8:29
    
Nice, thanks a lot! I will remember to always use @Override. –  Nicolas Raoul Jan 6 '12 at 8:31
    
I think FindBugs would also have caught this. Something about implementing equals but not hashCode. –  Thilo Jan 6 '12 at 8:34
    
+1, for having eyes of an eagle. :-) Regards –  nIcE cOw Jan 6 '12 at 8:53

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