Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my use of the Task Parallel Library in .net 4.0 I am wondering what is the best way to merge results from my parallel tasks, normally i would require a lock on a shared object between them, but now i wondering if the Task(TResult) class and merging at the end is a better solution? Below I have the two approaches i consider:

TPL with lock:

public MyObject DoWork()
{
    var result = new MyObject();
    var resultLock = new object();
    var taskArray = new Task[this._objects.Length];
    for (var i = 0; i < taskArray.Length; i++)
    {
        taskArray[i] = new Task((obj) =>
            {
                var _o = obj as AnObject;
                var tmpResult = _o.DoTaskWork();
                lock (resultLock)
                    result.Add(tmpResult);
            }, this._objects[i]);
    }
    Task.WaitAll(taskArray);
    return result;
}

And TPL with the merging at the end:

public MyObject DoWork()
{
    var taskArray = new Task<String>[this._objects.Length];
    for (var i = 0; i < taskArray.Length; i++)
    {
        taskArray[i] = new Task<String>((obj) =>
        {
            var _o = obj as AnObject;
            return _o.DoTaskWork();
        }, this._objects[i]);
    }
    Task<String>.WaitAll(taskArray);
    var result = new MyObject();
    for (var i = 0; i < taskArray.Length; i++)
        result.Add(taskArray[i].Result);
    return result;
}

Is there a right or wrong solution or what is a best practice (other possible solution to merging results from parallel tasks are most welcome)

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

using Parallel LINQ (which does all the nasty stuff for you), you could boil this down to a single line or so:

var workResults = _objects.AsParallel().Select(DoTaskWork);
foreach(var r in workResults)
{
    result.Add(r);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, I really like the suggested solution, simple and LINQ'ed, but if it is the case that i would use the Task library, what would be preferable! –  aweis Jan 6 '12 at 9:19
    
In which case, I would use one of the concurrent collections (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…) and add straight into it from the body of the task. Don't forget that PLinq uses TPL under the hood. –  spender Jan 6 '12 at 9:25
    
Okay, the ConcurrentDictionary would be something that fits very well. How does PLINQ perform, because i have often read that using LINQ to query the data structures is expensive in relation to time, is there some up/down side in PLINQ when time becomes a very important factor? –  aweis Jan 6 '12 at 9:32
    
I'd say a benchmark against your load would be the best way to establish what's fastest. I'm not fond of "Linq is slow" type statements. I imagine quite a lot of work went into PLinq with regards to optimising the partitioning of data and the collating of the results. It's probably going to be more efficient than hand-rolled merging, but once again, only a benchmark against your specific load will reveal what's best. –  spender Jan 6 '12 at 9:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.