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I want to unit test following method

public void addRecord(Record record)  
{  
   Myclass newObj = new Mycalss();  
   // It creates newObj object, set some values using record object.  
   // and it adds the newObj in daatbase.
   dataReqDao.persist(newObj);
}    

I have mocked dataReqDao.persist method but how can I verify if right values are copied into newObj object? I want to get the newObj object.

I think thenAnswer will be the appropraite method to retrieve newObj ie method arguments but dont know how to use it method which returns void.

Update:
I tried

doAnswer(new Answer<Myclass>() {
              public Myclass answer(InvocationOnMock invocation) {
                  Object[] args = invocation.getArguments();
                  return (Myclass)args[0];
              }

        }).when(dataReqDao.persist(any(Myclass.class)));

EDIT:
It should be (Thanks David)

 doAnswer(new Answer<Myclass>() {
                  public Myclass answer(InvocationOnMock invocation) {
                      Object[] args = invocation.getArguments();
                      return (Myclass)args[0];
                  }

            }).when(dataReqDao).persist(any(Myclass.class));
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In your update, the brackets are in the wrong place. I'm not sure whether that's the cause of your error, because the rest of it looks OK. So it should be doAnswer( ... ).when( dataReqDao ).persist( ... ); Does that help? –  David Wallace Jan 10 '12 at 22:56
    
@David: Thanks david. Actually I corrected that but forget to update my question. –  Karna Jan 11 '12 at 5:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can create a custom argument matcher that would check fields of that object, or use an argument captor to capture the object for further inspection.

For example, as follows:

ArgumentCaptor<Myclass> c = ArgumentCaptor.forClass(Myclass.class);
verify(dateReqDao).persist(c.capture());
Myclass newObj = c.getValue();

... // Validate newObj
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I tried your suggestion.Please check my edit. –  Karna Jan 6 '12 at 9:53
    
@Ajinkya: Updated –  axtavt Jan 6 '12 at 10:14
Myclass newObj = new Myclass();  

That line troubles me. If you are using dependency injection, you should have your factory send you an instance of that object. Then, when you create your unit tests, you can have the test factory send in a mock instance of MyClass which the unit test can also have access to. Then you can use axtavt's captor to see if it really did what it was supposed to do. There's nothing wrong with the unit test the way you did it, it's just that any() is kind of weak given that you know it is passing in an object of that type--what you want to know in the test is whether the object is the one you intended and has not been modified.

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