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I have a column that contains values similar to:

034004         
034010         
06012AB        
06012C         
06012D         
06012P               
06026C         
06026P   

Is there any way to separate or split these in two separate columns as numbers and letters? Does it matter that not all numbers contain letters?

I am using SQL Server Management Studio 2005

Cheers in advance for anything that can point me in the right direct

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Can the letters be intermixed (i.e. 12BA34CD) or will it always be number, followed by the letters (if any)? SQL's string functions aren't very great, but what you are asking can probably be done with them. –  Sparky Jan 6 '12 at 11:01
    
it is always a set format of a number followed by letters (if any) –  user1086159 Jan 6 '12 at 11:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Assuming it is always one group of numbers then (possibly) one group of letters

SELECT SUBSTRING(YourCol, 0, P),
       SUBSTRING(YourCol, P, 8000)
FROM   YourTable
       CROSS APPLY(SELECT PATINDEX('%[^0-9]%', YourCol + 'A')) Split(P) 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks that worked great at splitting out the numbers and letters into 2 columns. Much appreciated –  user1086159 Jan 6 '12 at 11:13
    
Thanks for this answer, it worked for me. However I don't understand what you did with the Split(P). Can you explain it please? –  ristonj Jul 6 '13 at 0:19
    
@ristonj That just puts the result of the expression PATINDEX('%[^0-9]%', YourCol + 'A') into a column aliased P that I can then reference in the SELECT clause instead of needing to repeat the longer expression. –  Martin Smith Jul 6 '13 at 17:33
    
Ok, thanks for the response, but then why did you use Split(P) as opposed to just P? –  ristonj Jul 9 '13 at 23:01

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