Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

A third party library that I am using regularly tampers with several Windows API functions, the most annoying one being SetUnhandledExceptionFilter. Which, unsurprisingly, makes my own handler entirely obsolete (try and find out why, if you don't know!).

I'd like to work around this stupidity. The obvious way would be to overwrite the the 5-byte hotpatch prologue with xor eax,eax ret 4 (after having called the function myself), effectively making any further calls no-op.

There are two concerns with this:

  1. Other programs that are running at the same time might want to legitimately call a patched function. They might not be totally braindamaged and might do something useful. Since shared libraries are shared, any other programs loading or already having loaded the same DLL while my program is running will be subject to the patch until my program restores the functionality at exit.
  2. SetUnhandledExceptionFilter lives in kernel32.dll, which is never unloaded. This means that in case of unanticipated non-exception program termination (i.e. user kills the process in TaskManager), the patch will persist until the machine is rebooted. This is a very nasty feature.

Is there a reliable way of doing such a thing and not disrupting/compromising proper functionality of the entire system at the same time?

I have thought about setting protection to PAGE_WRITECOPY rather than PAGE_WRITE before applying the patch (PAGE_EXECUTE_WRITECOPY is tempting too as it shouldn't require resetting protection to PAGE_EXECUTE_READ afterwards, but MSDN says this is only supported after Vista SP1, and XP functionality needs to be maintained).

In my understanding, this should constrain visibility of any changes I make to my process.

Is this a valid assumption, and will such a thing work, also in accordance with other features that I've maybe not thought of (such as DEP, or some special privilegues or other interferences)?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just replace that IAT entry in the 3rd party library that points to SetUnhandledExceptionFilter, this is far simpler, and is local to the 3rd party library only.

Even better, if the 3rd party library is a dll/binary that you distribute with your app, you can just NOP out the calls it makes to SetUnhandledExceptionFilter, this would prove easier and safer.

I have thought about setting protection to PAGE_WRITECOPY rather than PAGE_WRITE before applying the patch (PAGE_EXECUTE_WRITECOPY is tempting too as it shouldn't require resetting protection to PAGE_EXECUTE_READ afterwards, but MSDN says this is only supported after Vista SP1, and XP functionality needs to be maintained).

Actually, PAGE_EXECUTE_READWRITE is your best bet, but its generally a good idea to restore the original privileges, unless you need to check if you or someone else tampered with the memory already.

share|improve this answer
    
Replacing the IAT entry sounds like a good idea, thank you. –  Damon Jan 8 '12 at 20:06
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.