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Long story short, I'll provide a simplistic example where it might be useful:

public struct Vector3f {
    public float x;
    public float y;
    public float z;

    public unsafe float this[int index] {
        get {
            // Get "p" somehow, so that it points to "this"...

            return p[index];
        }

        set {
            // Get "p" somehow, so that it points to "this"...

            p[index] = value;
        }
    }
}

I guess you got my point there:

var v = new Vector3f();

Assert(v.x == v[0]);

EDIT 1:

For those, who still ask :)

Assert(v.y == v[1]);
Assert(v.z == v[2]);

EDIT 2:

Does fixed create redundant overhead here? Or maybe this struct is already fixed, and therefore fixed has no effect here and is only needed to satisfy the compiler? Possible answer.

share|improve this question
    
you want that v[0] returned x field value, v[1] y value and v[2] - z? –  Reniuz Jan 6 '12 at 12:39
    
Try: taking the address of first field. –  leppie Jan 6 '12 at 13:02
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You mean something like this?

get
{
    // (index validation omitted)
    fixed (Vector3f* thisPtr = &this)
    {
        return ((float*)thisPtr)[index];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Honestly: I never fixed this. That may be completely wrong. –  ordag Jan 6 '12 at 12:47
    
Yeah, that's fine, TY! –  Haroogan Jan 6 '12 at 13:05
1  
But is it really faster than the alternative? I did write some similar code, and in that case the unsafe fixed code wasn't faster than the safe code. –  CodesInChaos Jan 6 '12 at 23:22
    
@CodeInChaos No, I'm sure that's not, but this should be a "how you questioned it" and not a "what would be better" answer. –  ordag Jan 7 '12 at 0:35
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I agree with Eric that you probably don't want to do this, and I suspect Rob's solution does just as well (while avoiding the use of fixed). Still, it's worth noting that you can overlap your struct fields if you use LayoutKind.Explicit:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
public struct Vector3f
{
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    private float x;

    [FieldOffset(sizeof(float))]
    private float y;

    [FieldOffset(2 * sizeof(float))]
    private float z;

    [FieldOffset(0)]
    private unsafe fixed float indexed[3];

    public Vector3f(float x, float y, float z)
    {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
        this.z = z;
    }

    public float X { get { return x; } set { x = value; } }
    public float Y { get { return y; } set { y = value; } } 
    public float Z { get { return z; } set { z = value; } }

    public unsafe float this[int index]
    {
        get
        {
            if (index < 0 || index >= 3)
                throw new IndexOutOfRangeException();

            fixed (float* b = indexed)
                return b[index];
        }
        set
        {
            if (index < 0 || index >= 3)
                throw new IndexOutOfRangeException();

            fixed (float* b = indexed)
                b[index] = value;
        }
    }
}
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First off, I would not use unsafe code for this unless I had first determined (1) that the obvious code with the switch would be the slowest code in the entire program and causing significant, user-observable slowdowns, and that (2) going to unsafe code fixes the performance problem.

Second, if I were to use unsafe code, it is extraordinarily dangerous to make assumptions about structure packing. The CLR is allowed broad lattitude in how it chooses to pack structures. If you are going to do this dangerous thing then you should use the struct layout attribute to ensure that the floats are exactly where you need them to be.

Third, what stops a buggy caller from passing a negative index, or a too-large index?

Fourth:

Does fixed create redundant overhead here?

I don't know what "redundant overhead" means. "fixed" makes the jitter tell the garbage collector "do not move this thing because I need to do pointer arithmetic on it". You are fixing for a short period, which is ideal; fixing for a long time makes it more likely that a collection will get messed up because the pinned storage could not be moved.

Fifth:

Or maybe this struct is already fixed, and therefore fixed has no effect here and is only needed to satisfy the compiler?

Maybe! Maybe the variable referred to by "this" is already a fixed variable. Maybe it isn't. How is the compiler supposed to know whether the "this" of the struct is a ref to fixed storage or not? We have to assume the worst, so you are required to fix it.

share|improve this answer
    
But the struct in the question has a sequential layout in managed memory and contiguously packed types by default, doesn't it? –  ordag Jan 6 '12 at 16:14
4  
@ordag: I don't know -- does it? The C# specification states "The order in which members are packed into a struct is unspecified. For alignment purposes, there may be unnamed padding at the beginning of a struct, within a struct, and at the end of the struct." You are given no guarantee whatsoever that structures are packed in any particular way. If some implementation that you happen to be using just happens to pack structures in a way that you happen to like, that's your good luck. How far do you want to trust that luck? –  Eric Lippert Jan 6 '12 at 16:37
1  
@Haroogan: I have no idea what happens in the garbage collector when you run your code on your machine. You are the only one who can possibly know that. If you want to know if there's a performance problem when you run your code on your machine, then run your code on your machine and see if it is too slow. –  Eric Lippert Jan 6 '12 at 16:39
3  
@ordag: That guarantee might be made to you by some version of the runtime or some implementation of the C# compiler. My point is that the guarantee is not made by the C# language. Is the same guarantee made by Mono? By the compact framework? By some future implementation? I would not feel comfortable making those assumptions, but my opinions are coloured by many years of debugging godawful bugs caused by people -- some of whom were past versions of myself -- who made unwarranted assumptions about implementation details of structure layouts. Assumptions that turned out to be violated. –  Eric Lippert Jan 6 '12 at 16:55
6  
@Haroogan You're worrying about the costs associated with fixed, but it's still not clear why you need to use unsafe code here. Why not just make your struct an array to begin with? Or use a switch statement in the indexer? Or make X, Y and Z properties that are backed by indexes into a private array? These all sound like better options. –  dlev Jan 6 '12 at 16:57
show 9 more comments

I admit that it only solves this specific case and not the "general" case, but you could avoid unsafe by doing something like this (particularly as you state you're showing a simplified example - but it may be of use to others who visit this question):

public struct Vector3f
{
    public float x;
    public float y;
    public float z;

    public float this[int index]
    {
        get
        {
            switch (index)
            {
                case 0:
                    return x;
                case 1:
                    return y;
                case 2:
                    return z;
                default:
                    throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
            }
        }

        set
        {
            switch (index)
            {
                case 0:
                    x = value;
                    break;
                case 1:
                    y = value;
                    break;
                case 2:
                    z = value;
                    break;
                default:
                    throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well ordang's method works well. The one u suggest is actually what I wanted to avoid and what is strongly discouraged, since it is slow and boilerplate ;) –  Haroogan Jan 6 '12 at 13:08
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