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I know that casting can really only be done from a sub class to a super class (up casting) but this example illustrates what I would like to do.

Class Super {}
Class Sub extends Super {}

Super super = new Super();
Sub sub = (Sub)super;

I believe this is referred to as "down" casting which is not allowed so...

What is the best way to create an object of type Sub given an object of type Super.

EDIT:

That's the question - What's the best way to convert an Animal to a Cat.

The answer? Start with a base type animal and copy the attributes to the cat. Add fur and a tail, etc. Basically a copy constructor. Is this the right answer (or a good answer)?

ANOTHER EDIT:

I think my question is pretty clear but maybe it is too general. Asking for the "best" way to do something tends to give a lot of varying responses. I realize the best way can be different in different circumstances.

I'm not looking for a tutorial on Java or OO basics. Just fishing for opinions so I can solve this problem as I have outlined it using best practices.

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From your question, it's not at all clear what you know and what you don't know. So don't be surprised when people answer the I believe this is referred to as "down" casting which is not allowed part and not the (very vague) "actual question." Yes, copying constructor is the way. No, it's not the only one, factory method will do just fine. No, it's not the best one — we have no idea what constraints and assumptions you have. –  alf Jan 6 '12 at 13:36
    
@alf I can tell that my question is clear to you - Can you offer any more suggestions on how to word questions in general? I'd like to be able to ask a question that adds value to the site and gets valuable responses but in this case it seems I have kind of failed... misunderstood, downvoted and I've ended up being a bit frustrated. –  Matthew Jan 6 '12 at 13:44
1  
well, I can see the breakdown of votes, and there are no votes down. No votes up, either, but that wasn't the point, was it? The standard HOWTO would be catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html — it's nice and to the point. On the current question, I'd say that putting blame on people who tried to help is not a very productive idea; stating that your question is clear when you needed two edits is so close to blame that only a few will notice the difference. Add here "Thanks for actually reading my question," and you'll get a fair dose of aggression. Be kind. Fix the mistakes. Don't blame –  alf Jan 6 '12 at 13:52
    
...and, yes, "I can tell that my question is clear to you"—usually people get angry if someone's pretending to know their mind. I do indeed. It can be just fine in a real one-to-one chat, but not on public. –  alf Jan 6 '12 at 13:53
    
For the record, I'm not trying to (or don't mean to) blame as much as I am trying to counter and clarify. –  Matthew Jan 6 '12 at 14:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A Cat is an Animal.

If I give you an animal (doesn't have to be cat), how would you convert it to a cat?

EDIT:

There's a way to do almost anything. Most of the time, you shouldn't. I believe a better design would eliminate the need for downcasting. But you can:

  • have a constructor in Super that takes a Sub as parameter.

  • implement a factory of Super and have a method that takes a Sub as parameter.

I suggest that you expand your question, tell us exactly what you need, as I really think a more elegant solution exists.

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2  
@Matthew - just because there's a way to do it, doesn't mean you should. You'd be better off static what you want to achieve. Downcasting is rarely the answer, and I'm 99% sure a better solution exists in your case. –  Luchian Grigore Jan 6 '12 at 13:17
    
Thanks for the answer. I may just do some research and find out exactly what else I might need in this case and make a more detailed and specific question. This will definitely do what I need for right now as I was just asking for a general answer but I know I will run into a situation where I need something more specific later. –  Matthew Jan 6 '12 at 14:30

You could add a constructor to the Sub class which takes a Super object as a parameter.

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EDIT: From your question, it's not at all clear what you know and what you don't know. So don't be surprised when people answer the

I believe this is referred to as "down" casting which is not allowed

part and not the (very vague) "actual question."

Yes, copying constructor is the way.

No, it's not the only one, factory method will do just fine.

No, it's not the best one — we have no idea what constraints and assumptions you have.


Old version: Casting can be done either way, with upcasting being usually unnecessary (unless you need to select a specific overloaded method).

There's generally no way to create an object of type Sub given an object of type Super other than creating a method which would construct a new object basing on the data from the given one.

In order to cast, you must be sure that the object you're casting is in fact of the type you cast to (or its subtype).

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I stated specifically that I know that up casting is allowed and I know that down casting is not. I finish it up by asking what is the best way to do x given this information. I'm being a bit rhetorical right now - how am I being unclear? –  Matthew Jan 6 '12 at 13:56
    
@Matthew well, downcasting is allowed. It's not clear whether you know what "downcasting" is, because it is indeed allowed, so it's either the usual "that vs which" problem or a lack of understanding. Basing on the previous experience, many assume the lack of understanding. –  alf Jan 6 '12 at 14:02
    
I guess I could say "I know down casting is not allowed" ... " in this particular situation." –  Matthew Jan 6 '12 at 14:17
1  
@Matthew That would made things easier, true. As well as dropping "I believe it's called"—indirection usually means lack of confidence, so everyone was eager to tell you what downcasting was :) –  alf Jan 6 '12 at 14:19

You can only downcast if the actual object is of the type "Sub". For example:

Super subAsSuper = new Sub();
Sub sub = (Sub)subAsSuper

Your way won't work because super isn't a subclass of sub. So you'll get a Runtime error.

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Take this idea in mind -

Class Super {}
Class Sub {
    public Super super = new Super();
}

Super super = new Super();
Sub sub = new Sub();
sub.super = super;

I did a very basic example here, but you can go where ever you want with this, you can make it work identically like inheritance. and it won't return any errors however.

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