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I am working on a base class for my entity framework database context classes. In the base class I need access to the DbContext and in the derived class I need access to the derived DbContext. At the moment I have the following code:

 public abstract class BaseClass: IDisposable   
{
    protected abstract DbContext BaseContext { get; }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (BaseContext != null)
        {
            BaseContext.Dispose();
        }
    }
}

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    DerivedContext context; // public class DerivedContext: DbContext

    protected override DbContext BaseContext 
    {
        get
        {
            return context;
        }           
    }
}

Is this a correct approach?

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1  
Why do you do that? I think what you're trying to achieve is something like castleproject.org/activerecord –  Jani Jan 6 '12 at 13:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would suggest something more like

public abstract class BaseClass<TContext> : IDisposable 
    where TContext : DbContext
{
    //not abstract
    protected TContext Context { get; private set; }
}

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass<DerivedContext>
{
    ....
}

In your base class you can access all of the member of DbContext and in your DerivedClass, you can access all of the members of DerviedContext without the need to cast.

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Depending on how much you need to do very special stuff in your derived class, you could also go for an generic approach in the first place. From this you can also inherit.

public class BaseClass<TContext> : IDisposable   
   where TContext : IContext
{

    public TContext Context { get; private set; }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (Context != null)
        {
            Context.Dispose();
        }
    }

    public BaseClass(TContext context)
    {
       this.Context = context;
    }
}

public interface IContext : IDisposable
{

}

public ChildClass : BaseClass<MyContext>
{
   public ChildClass(MyContext context)
     : base(context)
   {
   }
}
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It somewhat depends on how you expect to use it. The code you posted will always use the derived context with an instance of a derived class, and the base context with the base class.

// This code gets an instance of the DerivedContext.
BaseClass myBase = new DerivedClass();
DbContext myContext = myBase.BaseContext;

If this is how you intend it to work, you are using the right approach.

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you don't want the domain object depending on the dbcontext. the domain should have no knowledge of the dbcontex. to answer your question: no, this isn't "correct".

what you may have is a series of components layered around the domain objects which use the dbcontext to load/save entities.

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I'm not sure why you think BaseClass and DerivedClass are domain objects. The question does not seem to indicate that. –  cadrell0 Jan 6 '12 at 14:01
    
@cadrell0 reading through the OP a 2nd time, your right. I assumed a domain object because of the comment left by @Jani about AR. –  Jason Meckley Jan 6 '12 at 16:22

At least your IDisposable implementation has to be improved. You should do as following:

IDisposable example:

public class BaseClass : IDisposable
{
    private bool _disposed = false;
    protected DbContext Context { get; }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        this.Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        // Check to see if Dispose has already been called.
        if (!this._disposed)
        {
            // If disposing equals true, dispose all managed
            // and unmanaged resources.
            if (disposing)
            {
                // Disposes managed resources here
                if (this.Context != null)
                {
                    this.Context.Dispose();
                }
            }

            // Disposes unmanaged resources here
            // NOTHING HERE

            // Note disposing has been done.
            this._disposed = true;
        }
    }
}

For the DBContext itself, it depends on how you intend to use it.

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