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Recently started digging in to JSON, and I'm currently trying to use a number as "identifier", which doesn't work out too well. foo:"bar" works fine, while 0:"bar" doesn't.

var Game = {

        status: [

                    {
                        0:"val",
                        1:"val",
                        2:"val"
                    },

                    {
                        0:"val",
                        1:"val",
                        2:"val"
                    }

                ]

    }


        alert(Game.status[0].0);

Is there any way to do it the following way? (Game.status[0].0) Would make my life way easier. Of course there's other ways around it, but this way is prefered. This is probably also a stupid question.

Thanks.

(Title might be a bit incorrect)

share|improve this question
    
The reason for this is that in JavaScript, as many other languages, a property's/variable's name cannot start with a number, but only with $, _, a-z and A-Z. Why isn't Game.status[0] an array? Then your syntax would be Game.status[0][0]. –  nikc.org Jan 6 '12 at 13:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

JSON only allows key names to be strings. Those strings can consist of numerical values.

You aren't using JSON though. You have a JavaScript object literal. You can use identifiers for keys, but an identifier can't start with a number. You can still use strings though.

var Game={
    "status": [
        {
            "0": "val",
            "1": "val",
            "2": "val"
        },
        {
            "0": "val",
            "1": "val",
            "2": "val"
        }
    ]
}

If you access the properties with dot-notation, then you have to use identifiers. Use square bracket notation instead: Game[0][0].

But given that data, an array would seem to make more sense.

var Game={
    "status": [
        [
            "val",
            "val",
            "val"
        ],
        [
            "val",
            "val",
            "val"
        ]
    ]
}
share|improve this answer
    
This would still not allow you to do Game.status[0].0 –  JaredMcAteer Jan 6 '12 at 13:48
1  
No, but will allow Game.status[0][0]. –  Amadan Jan 6 '12 at 13:49
1  
@OriginalSyn it's impossible to have ´Game.status[0].0´ because Javascript only allows property names to begin with a letter or an underscore if you want to use the dot notation. There's no way around that. –  Vahur Roosimaa Jan 6 '12 at 13:52
    
Thanks a lot for the answer, exactly what I was looking for. Honestly, I have no idea why I didn't think of an array to start with - I'll blame it on brain freeze. –  Zar Jan 6 '12 at 13:56

Probably you need an array?

var Game = {

    status: [
        ["val", "val","val"],
        ["val", "val", "val"]
    ]
}

alert(Game.status[0][0]);
share|improve this answer

When a Javascript object property's name doesn't begin with either an underscore or a letter, you cant use the dot notation (like Game.status[0].0), and you must use the alternative notation, which is Game.status[0][0].

One different note, do you really need it to be an object inside the status array? If you're using the object like an array, why not use a real array instead?

share|improve this answer

What about

Game.status[0][0] or Game.status[0]["0"] ?

Does one of these work?

PS: What you have in your question is a Javascript Object, not JSON. JSON is the 'string' version of a Javascript Object.

share|improve this answer
    
"JSON is the 'string' version of a Javascript Object." That is not true. A JSON object is a subset of a JavaScript Object. Otherwise you're correct that is a JavaScript Object since it doesn't conform to the JSON spec –  JaredMcAteer Jan 6 '12 at 13:47
    
JSON is a subset of JavaScript object literal notation and a JSON object is a data type that can be expressed in JSON. –  Quentin Jan 6 '12 at 13:51
    
@OriginalSyn: Well, not really. JSON is an "interchangeable" format, and is used as a language-independent string format. Most languages can parse JSON, and in Javascript, it will turn into a Javascript Object. See benalman.com/news/2010/03/theres-no-such-thing-as-a-json. –  Willem Mulder Jan 6 '12 at 13:59
    
@OriginalSyn: In JavaScript, object literals are never JSON, because JSON is always a string. Object literals are not strings. The term "JSON object" doesn't make sense, because something can't be both "JSON" - a string, and an "object" - a non-string. –  nnnnnn Jan 6 '12 at 14:59

First off, it's not JSON: JSON mandates that all keys must be strings.

Secondly, regular arrays do what you want:

var Game = {
  status: [
    [
      "val",
      "val",
      "val"
    ],
    [
      "val",
      "val",
      "val"
    ]
  }
}

will work, if you use Game.status[0][0]. You cannot use numbers with the dot notation (.0).

Alternatively, you can quote the numbers (i.e. { "0": "val" }...); you will have plain objects instead of Arrays, but the same syntax will work.

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