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I have

var result =  (from rev in Revisions 
   join usr in Users on rev.UserID equals usr.ID
    join clc in ChangedLinesCounts on rev.Revision equals clc.Revision
    select new {rev.Revision, 
    rev.Date, usr.UserName, usr.ID, clc.LinesCount}).Take(6);

I make a couple of joins on different tables, not relevant for this question what keys are, but at the end of this query my result "table" contains

{Revision, Date, UserName, ID, LinesCount}

Now I execute e GroupBy in order to calculate a total lines count per user.

So..

from row in result group row by row.ID into g  {1}
    select new { 
        g.Key,
        totalCount = g.Sum(count=>count.LinesCount)
    };

So I get a Key=ID, and totalCount=Sum, but

Confusion

I would like to have also other fields in final result. In my understanding "table" after {1} grouping query consist of

{Revision, Date, UserName, ID, LinesCount, TotalCount}

If my assumption is correct, why I can not do something like this:

from row in result group row by row.ID into g  {1}
        select new { 
            g.Key,
                g.Revision //Revision doesn't exist ! Why ??
            totalCount = g.Sum(count=>count.LinesCount)
        };

but

from row in result group row by row.ID into g  {1}
            select new { 
                g.Key,
                    Revision = g.Select(x=>x.Revision), //Works !
                totalCount = g.Sum(count=>count.LinesCount)
            };

Works !, but imo, sucks, cause I execute another Select.

Infact looking on LinqPad SQL output I get 2 SQL queries.

Question

Is there any elegant and optimal way to do this, or I always need to run Select on groupped data, in order to be able to access the fields, that exists ?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is, that you only group by ID - if you'd do that in SQL, you couldn't access the other fields either...

To have the other fields as well, you have to include them in you group clause:

from row in result group row by new { row.ID, row.Revision } into g
    select new { 
        g.Key.ID,
        g.Key.Revision
        totalCount = g.Sum(count=>count.LinesCount)
    };
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The problem here is your output logically looks something like this:

Key = 1
    Id = 1, Revision = 3587, UserName = Bob, LinesCount = 34, TotalCount = 45
    Id = 1, Revision = 3588, UserName = Joe, LinesCount = 64, TotalCount = 54
    Id = 1, Revision = 3589, UserName = Jim, LinesCount = 37, TotalCount = 26

Key = 2
    Id = 2, Revision = 3587, UserName = Bob, LinesCount = 34, TotalCount = 45
    Id = 2, Revision = 3588, UserName = Joe, LinesCount = 64, TotalCount = 54
    Id = 2, Revision = 3589, UserName = Jim, LinesCount = 37, TotalCount = 26

Much like if you were to perform a an SQL GROUP BY, an value is either part of the key and thus unique per group, or is in the details and thus is repeated multiple times and possibly different for each row.

Now, logically, it might be that Revision and UserName are unique for each Id but Linq has no way to know that (the same as SQL has no way to know that).

To solve this you'll need to some how specify which revision you want. For instance:

Revision = g.FirstOrDefault(x => x.Revision)

To avoid the multiple SQL problem you would need to use an aggregate function that can be translated in to SQL since most SQL dialects do not have a first operator (the result set is considered unordered so technically no item is "first").

Revision = g.Min(x => x.Revision)
Revision = g.Max(x => x.Revision)

Unfortunately Linq does not have a min/max operator for strings, so although the SQL might support this, Linq does not.

In this case you can produce an intermediate result set for the Id and totals, then join this back to the original set to get the details, eg:

from d in items
join t in (
    from t in items
    group by t.Id into g
    select new { Id = g.Key, Total = g.Sum(x => x.LineCount) }
) on d.Id equals t.Id
select new { Id = d.Id, Revision = d.Revision, Total = t.Total }
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why not use lambda syntax. –  CoffeeAddict Mar 31 '13 at 5:41

Revision doesn't exist in your second example because it's not a member of IGrouping<T>, in IGrouping<T> you have a Key property, and it's also an IEnumerable<T> for all the rows grouped together. Thus each of those rows has a Revision, but there is no Revision for the grouping itself.

If the Revision will be the same for all rows with the same ID, you could use FirstOrDefault() so that the select nets at most one answer:

from row in result group row by row.ID into g  {1}
            select new { 
                g.Key,
                Revision = g.Select(x=>x.Revision).FirstOrDefault(),
                totalCount = g.Sum(count=>count.LinesCount)
            };

If the Revision is not unique per ID, though, you'd want to use an anonymous type as @Tobias suggests for the grouping, then you will get a grouping based on ID and Revision.

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yes, but it sucks to execute a Select on that, I think the solution of Tobias, as actual a solution. Cause it produce single SQL query, so single execution and data recovery which is important. –  Tigran Jan 6 '12 at 14:43

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