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I have to implement game of life, it is almost complete, the last thing I want to do is to allocate my field dynamical. I'm working under Windows, got no Valgrind and I don't no what's the error in my code. Eclipse shows only that the process is not functional anymore.

Can anyone tell me, what's the problem in my code? Or maybe I don't need a 2 dim. array for game of life field?

struct game_field  {
    int length;
    int **field;
};


static struct game_field *new_game_field(unsigned int l) {
    struct game_field *pstField;
    pstField = calloc(1, sizeof(struct game_field));
    pstField->length = l;
    pstField->field = malloc(l * sizeof(int*));
    for( int i = 0; i < l; i++ ) {
        pstField->field[i] = malloc(l * sizeof(int));
        if(NULL == pstField->field[i]) {
             printf("No memory for line %d\n",i);
        }
    }
    return pstField;
}
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1  
What's the point of memory checking just one of three memory allocations? Have you checked that calloc or the first malloc isn't returning NULL? –  ams Jan 6 '12 at 15:53
    
Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/2079262/… –  Karlson Jan 6 '12 at 16:19
    
There's not necessarily any thought to that, I could check for null also the other allocations –  pfu Jan 6 '12 at 16:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should think a little bit about the structures and what you are storing.

For the game of life you need to know the state of the cell on the board which is indicated by and integer so your struct should become:

struct game_field  {
   int length;
   int *field;
};

And once you know the dimensions of the field you should allocate it once:

struct game_field *gf = calloc(1, sizeof(struct game_field));
gf->length = <blah>;
gf->field = malloc(gf->length*gf->length*sizeof(int));

This way you have an array of integers that you can use as your board.

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Except you can't access that using 2D array notation. You'd need to say gf->field[x*hdim+y]. –  ams Jan 6 '12 at 15:58
    
Hm, I don't get that notation. Is it like: (pstField->field+ipstField->length+j) or how? Or what's the "x" ? –  pfu Jan 6 '12 at 16:04
    
@ams that's true but you can do gf->field2d = (int **)gf->field; and you have your 2d representation. –  Karlson Jan 6 '12 at 16:11
    
@Michael The 2d arrays are stored in memory as a contiguous space so in order to access element in row x column y in that representation you will need to do it as ams pointed out except instead of hdim you will use length –  Karlson Jan 6 '12 at 16:14
1  
@Karlson: no, I don't think casting an int* to an int** is going to make anything 2D. 2D arrays with pointers just don't work the same as statically declared arrays. In the one case the compiler does a double indirection, whereas in the other it uses knowledge of the row/column size to do pointer arithmetic. If you use malloc to create your own field as one block then you need to do the arithmetic yourself, as I showed. –  ams Jan 6 '12 at 16:36

The first malloc should be:

pstField->field = malloc(l * sizeof(int*));

Your array is int**, so the first level of allocation is an int*.

Edit: Well, I've tested your code and it does not crash for me. The problem might be somewhere else.

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Yes you are right, I forget that - thanks, but the main problem persists –  pfu Jan 6 '12 at 15:41
    
@Michael: are you sure you have isolated the problem to this piece of code? –  Tudor Jan 6 '12 at 15:46
    
Hm I don't think so, but Karlson's idea is maybe a good one ;) –  pfu Jan 6 '12 at 15:53
    
Hmmm... have you tried casting the result of malloc to int** and int* respectively? –  Tudor Jan 6 '12 at 15:54
    
Yes I have tried that, but still not working –  pfu Jan 6 '12 at 15:56

Here's a modification of your code that allocates the field in one block, but still lets you use array brackets for both dimensions:

struct game_field {
  int   length;
  int **field;
};

static struct game_field *new_game_field(unsigned int len)
{
  struct game_field *pstField;
  pstField = malloc(sizeof(struct game_field));
  pstField->length = len;

  /* allocate enough space for all the row pointers + the row contents */
  pstField->field = malloc((len * sizeof(int *)) + (len * len * sizeof(int)));

  /* point the row pointers (at the start of the block) at the row contents
   * (further into the block). */
  for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
    pstField->field[i] = (int *)(&field[len]) + (i * len);

  return pstField;
}

This way you can free the field in one shot:

void free_game_field(struct game_field *gf)
{
  free(gf->field);
  free(gf);
}

And you can keep the bracket notation to access the elements:

int row7col3 = gf->field[7][3];

Note that what you have (here as well as in your original code) is not exactly a two-dimensional array, but an array of pointers to arrays of integers (there is a difference, but the arr[x][y] notation can work for either one).

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