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I'm trying to write my own (simple) implementation of List. This is what I did so far:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace provaIEnum
{
    class MyList<T> : IEnumerable<T>
    {
        private T[] _array;
        public int Count { get; private set; }

        public MyList() { /* ... */ }
        public void Add(T element) { /* ... */ }

        // ...

        public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < Count; i++)
                yield return _array[i];
        }
    }

I'm getting an error about GetEnumerator though:

'provaIEnum.Lista' does not implement interface member 'System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()'. 'provaIEnum.Lista.GetEnumerator()' cannot implement 'System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()' because it does not have the matching return type of 'System.Collections.IEnumerator'.

I'm not sure if I understand what VS's trying to tell me and I have no idea how to fix it.

Thanks for your time

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6 Answers

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Since IEnumerable<T> implements IEnumerable you need to implement this interface as well in your class which has the non-generic version of the GetEnumerator method. To avoid conflicts you could implement it explicitly:

IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
{
    // call the generic version of the method
    return this.GetEnumerator();
}

public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < Count; i++)
        yield return _array[i];
}
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Thank you, I didn't know IEnumerable<T> implements IEnumerable (though it sounds obvious :P) –  BlackBear Jan 6 '12 at 15:54
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Read the error message more carefully; it is telling you exactly what you must do. You did not implement System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator.

When you implement the generic IEnumerable<T> you have to also implement System.Collections.IEnumerable's GetEnumerator.

The standard way to do so is:

public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator () { whatever }
System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
{
    return this.GetEnumerator();
}
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+1 for the 'standard way', keep learning every day :) –  BlackBear Jan 6 '12 at 15:55
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You'll need to implement the non-generic GetEnumerator method as well:

IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
{
    return GetEnumerator<T>();
}

Since the IEnumerable<T> interface extends IEnumerable, you have to implement the methods declared on both.

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Explicit interface implementations must not have an access modifier –  Nuffin Jan 6 '12 at 15:44
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Add the following method:

IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
{
    return this.GetEnumerator();
}
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There are two overloads of GetEnumerator() that you must implement. One comes from IEnumerable<T> and returns IEnumerator<T>. The other comes from IEnumerable and returns IEnumerator. The override should look like this:

IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()

This is because IEnumerable<T> implements IEnumerable.

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Since your class, MyList<T> inherits IEnumerable<out T> which in turn inherits the non-generic IEnumerable, you have two methods you need to implement:

IEnumerator<T> IEnumerable<T>.GetEnumerator()
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }

        System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }

An easy way to do this is when you declare your class:

class MyList<T> : IEnumerable<T>

Right click the IEnumerable<T> text and select Implement Interface > Implement Interface Explictly from the context menu.

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