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Scott Meyers says:

C++ specifies that an object thrown as an exception is always copied and the copying is performed by the object's copy constructor.

But in my code:

struct test
{
    test() { cout << "constructor is called" << endl; }
    test(const test&) { cout << "copy constructor is called" << endl; }
    ~test() { cout << "destructor is called" << endl; }
};

void fun()
{
    throw test();
}

int main()
{
    try { 
       fun();
    }
    catch (test& t1) { cout << "exception handler" << endl; }
}

I do not see the exception object's copy constructor being called.

If I change the catch to receive the exception object by value then it is, but according to Meyers's quote the exception object should have been copied even when it's received by reference.

Why is the copy constructor is not called (even when exception handling is performed by reference)?

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2  
What is your question? –  cdeszaq Jan 6 '12 at 16:15
5  
The question is "which is wrong: Meyers or my compiler?" Don't close questions just because you don't understand them. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 6 '12 at 16:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Meyers is correct that a copy is made, semantically:

[C++11: 12.2/1]: Temporaries of class type are created in various contexts: binding a reference to a prvalue (8.5.3), returning a prvalue (6.6.3), a conversion that creates a prvalue (4.1, 5.2.9, 5.2.11, 5.4), throwing an exception (15.1), entering a handler (15.3), and in some initializations (8.5). [..]

[C++11: 15.1/4]: The memory for the temporary copy of the exception being thrown is allocated in an unspecified way, except as noted in 3.7.3.1. The temporary persists as long as there is a handler being executed for that exception.

However, copies can be elided by clever compilers and they are allowed to do so regardless of side-effects.

[C++11: 12.8/31]: When certain criteria are met, an implementation is allowed to omit the copy/move construction of a class object, even if the copy/move constructor and/or destructor for the object have side effects. In such cases, the implementation treats the source and target of the omitted copy/move operation as simply two different ways of referring to the same object, and the destruction of that object occurs at the later of the times when the two objects would have been destroyed without the optimization. This elision of copy/move operations, called copy elision, is permitted in the following circumstances (which may be combined to eliminate multiple copies):

  • [..]
  • when a temporary class object that has not been bound to a reference (12.2) would be copied/moved to a class object with the same cv-unqualified type, the copy/move operation can be omitted by constructing the temporary object directly into the target of the omitted copy/move.
  • [..]
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3  
For 12.8/31 we're actually in the next case, "when a temporary class object that has not been bound to a reference (12.2) would be copied/moved to a class object with the same cv-unqualified type, the copy/move operation can be omitted by constructing the temporary object directly into the target of the omitted copy/move". test() is the temporary, the exception object allocated in an unspecified way is the object to which it is being copy/moved, which happens also to be a temporary. We aren't in the case you highlighted, since the operand test() is not the name of an object. –  Steve Jessop Jan 6 '12 at 16:22
    
@SteveJessop: True. Also I think the condition regarding scope fails because of the "function call indirection" (term made up by me). –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 6 '12 at 16:24
    
@SteveJessop: Is the final case irrelevant because of the accept-by-ref? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 6 '12 at 16:25
    
The bit you highlighted is to allow copy elision in the case void fun() { test foo; throw foo; }. So the scope of foo is just the function fun(), which doesn't contain the innermost try-block. I don't know why it forbids copy-elision for void fun() { try { test foo; throw foo; } catch (std::bad_alloc &) {} and void fun(test foo) { throw foo; }, though, I can't quite see why anyone would want to rely on the side-effects of the copy in those cases. –  Steve Jessop Jan 6 '12 at 16:28
    
Meh, I'm not going to think too hard about it. This answer is correct "enough". :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 6 '12 at 16:29

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