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In the code below, C's base class B1's template argument OFFSET depends on B0, and B2 on B1.

This is done by manual write the code every time an instance of C is created (in the main method). Is there a way to move this functionality to the definition of C instead?

template<int OFFSET>
struct A {
    enum O { offset = OFFSET };
    enum S { size = 2 };
};

template<int OFFSET>
struct B {
    enum O { offset = OFFSET };
    enum S { size = 4 };
};

template < typename B0, typename B1, typename B2 >
struct C : public B0, B1, B2 {
};

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
    // instance of C
    C< A<1>,

       B< A<1>::offset * A<1>::size >,

       A<
           B< A<1>::offset * A<1>::size >::offset *
           B< A<1>::offset * A<1>::size >::size
       >
    > c1;

    // does the same thing
    C< A<1>,

       B< A<1>::size >,

       A<
           A<1>::size *
           B< A<1>::size >::size
       >
    > c2;

    return 0;
}

EDIT:

To answer the comments, here are the steps I think needs to be taken to solve this:

  • Write a metafunction which can change the offset: set_new_offset which for T defines the type T<2>

  • Use boost::mpl::times to calculate the new offsets

  • Add more template magic...

share|improve this question
2  
What real problem are you trying to solve? –  Mark B Jan 6 '12 at 17:09
    
@MarkB it is a long story, but part of the real problem is to learn metaprogramming in c++. –  Allan Jan 6 '12 at 17:15
    
It does seem like you're trying to solve a problem in an unusual way. You're inheriting from three structs only to gain access to 3 OFFSET and 3 SIZE enums. And the second and third can be calculated in terms of the first. –  Drew Dormann Jan 6 '12 at 17:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can do it with template templates in C, although I'm not 100% sold it's an improvement. If you only ever need three bases this should be fine. If you need an arbitrary number of bases...there must be a better way to do this than inheritance as this method will get unwieldy.

template<int OFFSET>
struct A {
    enum O { offset = OFFSET };
    enum S { size = 2 };
};

template<int OFFSET>
struct B {
    enum O { offset = OFFSET };
    enum S { size = 4 };
};

template < typename B0, template <int T> class B1, template <int T> class B2 >
struct C : public B0, B1<B0::offset * B0::size>, B2<B1<B0::offset * B0::size>::offset * B1<B0::offset * B0::size>::size> {
    enum
    {
        B0_offset = B0::offset,
        B1_offset = B1<B0::offset * B0::size>::offset,
        B2_offset = B2<B1<B0::offset * B0::size>::offset * B1<B0::offset * B0::size>::size>::offset,
        B0_size = B0::size,
        B1_size = B1<B0::offset * B0::size>::size,
        B2_size = B2<B1<B0::offset * B0::size>::offset * B1<B0::offset * B0::size>::size>::size
    };
};

int main()
{
    // instance of C
    C< A<1>,

       B,

       A
    > c1;

    static_cast<void>(c1);

    // does the same thing
    C< A<1>,

       B,

       A
    > c2;

    static_cast<void>(c2);

    std::cout << c1.B0_offset << std::endl;
    std::cout << c1.B1_offset << std::endl;
    std::cout << c1.B2_offset << std::endl;
    std::cout << c1.B0_size << std::endl;
    std::cout << c1.B1_size << std::endl;
    std::cout << c1.B2_size << std::endl;

    std::cout << c2.B0_offset << std::endl;
    std::cout << c2.B1_offset << std::endl;
    std::cout << c2.B2_offset << std::endl;
    std::cout << c2.B0_size << std::endl;
    std::cout << c2.B1_size << std::endl;
    std::cout << c2.B2_size << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I did not know about template template arguments before, smart... In the current implementation I need this for 32 arguments so I hope for a further improvements... –  Allan Jan 6 '12 at 18:11
    
@Allan If you need 32 templates arguments, I'm 99% sure you're doing something sub-optimally. –  Mark B Jan 6 '12 at 18:18
    
I sure am, but the project I'm working on has still not switched to c++0x –  Allan Jan 6 '12 at 18:22
    
Some preprocessor code makes it actually look okay: #define B0_ B0<1>, #define B1_ B1<B0_::offset * B0_::size>, #define B2_ B2<B1_::offset * B1_::size> –  Allan Jan 6 '12 at 18:30

How about defining a helper class:

template <template <int> class C, int N>
struct Composer
{
    enum O { offset = C<N>::offset * C<N>::size; };
    enum S { size = C<N>::size; };
};

Then you can say:

C<A<1>, Composer<A, 1>, Composer<B, Composer<A, 1>::offset> c2;

If necessary one could think up a higher-order composer that allows you to form higher "powers" of composition.

(Maybe Composer should have been called Bind1st or so...)

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry, but I do not understand your solution. Have you noticed that A and B are different? (size=2 and size=4). The code you have suggested C will derive from Composer, not from A and B? How would that work for more complex version of A and B? (and version where A and B are more different?) –  Allan Jan 6 '12 at 17:59
    
@Allan: Sorry, the size was indeed an error. I think it's fixed now. –  Kerrek SB Jan 6 '12 at 18:06

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