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I just wrote some code to scale a font to fit within (the length of) a rectangle. It starts at 18 width and iterates down until it fits.

This seems horribly inefficient, but I can't find a non-looping way to do it. This line is for labels in a game grid that scales, so I can't see a work-around solution (wrapping, cutting off and extending past the rectangle are all unacceptable).

It's actually pretty quick, I'm doing this for hundreds of rectangles and it's fast enough to just slow it down a touch.

If nobody comes up with anything better, I'll just load the starting guess from a table (so that it's much closer than 18) and use this--except for the lag it works great.

public Font scaleFont(String text, Rectangle rect, Graphics g, Font pFont) {
    float nextTry=18.0f;
    Font font=pFont;

    while(x > 4) {                             
            font=g.getFont().deriveFont(nextTry);
            FontMetrics fm=g.getFontMetrics(font);
            int width=fm.stringWidth(text);
            if(width <= rect.width)
                return font;
            nextTry*=.9;            
    }
    return font;
}
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Huh. Turns out Netbeans isn't too fond of using try as an identifier... –  Tharwen May 26 '12 at 18:58

6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

semi-psuedo code:

public Font scaleFont(String text, Rectangle rect, Graphics g, Font pFont) {
    float fontSize = 20.0f;
    Font font = pFont;

    font = g.getFont().deriveFont(fontSize);
    int width = g.getFontMetrics(font).stringWidth(text);
    fontSize = (rect.width / width ) * fontSize;
    return g.getFont().deriveFont(fontSize);
}

i'm not sure why you pass in pFont as it's not used...

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Good answer. If I'm understanding your code, it reminds me of a Newton-Raphson approximation. Maybe do that twice instead of once, to be more accurate, as there may be some rounding error. –  ChrisW May 18 '09 at 4:53
    
Good catch with the pFont--threw that in at the last second after scooping this code out of another method and didn't give it much thought. This looks tempting! I'm not totally sure I'd get the right size (not sure font sizes grow linearly) but if nothing else it will make an AWESOME first guess. –  Bill K May 18 '09 at 21:30
    
Yeah, I thought about the fact that it mightn't scale like that. I figured that if you wanted it to be the size of a rectangle without it being within a bounding box then this would be fine. Otherwise, your testing would show if it's good enough and you could then add a short iteration loop to fix it. –  Luke Schafer May 20 '09 at 0:02

You can improve the efficiency using a binary search pattern - high/low with some granularity - either 1, 0.5 or 0.25 points.

For example, guess at 18, too high? Move to 9, too Low? 13.5, too low? 15.75, too high? 14!

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You could use interpolation search:

public static Font scaleFont(String text, Rectangle rect, Graphics g, Font pFont) {
    float min=0.1f;
    float max=72f;
    float size=18.0f;
    Font font=pFont;

    while(max - min <= 0.1) {
        font = g.getFont().deriveFont(size);
        FontMetrics fm = g.getFontMetrics(font);
        int width = fm.stringWidth(text);
        if (width == rect.width) {
            return font;
        } else {
            if (width < rect.width) {
                min = size;
            } else {
                max = size;
            }
            size = Math.min(max, Math.max(min, size * (float)rect.width / (float)width));
        }
    }
    return font;
}
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Change all width variables to float instead of int for better result.

public static Font scaleFontToFit(String text, int width, Graphics g, Font pFont)
{
    float fontSize = pFont.getSize();
    float fWidth = g.getFontMetrics(pFont).stringWidth(text);
    if(fWidth <= width)
        return pFont;
    fontSize = ((float)width / fWidth) * fontSize;
    return pFont.deriveFont(fontSize);
}
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private Font scaleFont ( String text, Rectangle rect, Graphics gc )
{
    final float fMinimumFont = 0.1f;
    float fMaximumFont = 1000f;

    /* Use Point2d.Float to hold ( font, width of font in pixels ) pairs. */
    Point2D.Float lowerPoint = new Point2D.Float ( fMinimumFont, getWidthInPixelsOfString ( text, fMinimumFont, gc ) );
    Point2D.Float upperPoint = new Point2D.Float ( fMaximumFont, getWidthInPixelsOfString ( text, fMaximumFont, gc ) );
    Point2D.Float midPoint = new Point2D.Float ();

    for ( int i = 0; i < 50; i++ )
    {
        float middleFont = ( lowerPoint.x + upperPoint.x ) / 2;

        midPoint.setLocation ( middleFont, getWidthInPixelsOfString ( text, middleFont, gc ) );

        if ( midPoint.y >= rect.getWidth () * .95 && midPoint.y <= rect.getWidth () )
            break;
        else if ( midPoint.y < rect.getWidth () )
            lowerPoint.setLocation ( midPoint );
        else if ( midPoint.y > rect.getWidth () )
            upperPoint.setLocation ( midPoint );
    }

    fMaximumFont = midPoint.x;

    Font font = gc.getFont ().deriveFont ( fMaximumFont );

    /* Now use Point2d.Float to hold ( font, height of font in pixels ) pairs. */
    lowerPoint.setLocation ( fMinimumFont, getHeightInPixelsOfString ( text, fMinimumFont, gc ) );
    upperPoint.setLocation ( fMaximumFont, getHeightInPixelsOfString ( text, fMaximumFont, gc ) );

    if ( upperPoint.y < rect.getHeight () )
        return font;

    for ( int i = 0; i < 50; i++ )
    {
        float middleFont = ( lowerPoint.x + upperPoint.x ) / 2;

        midPoint.setLocation ( middleFont, getHeightInPixelsOfString ( text, middleFont, gc ) );

        if ( midPoint.y >= rect.getHeight () * .95 && midPoint.y <= rect.getHeight () )
            break;
        else if ( midPoint.y < rect.getHeight () )
            lowerPoint.setLocation ( midPoint );
        else if ( midPoint.y > rect.getHeight () )
            upperPoint.setLocation ( midPoint );
    }

    fMaximumFont = midPoint.x;

    font = gc.getFont ().deriveFont ( fMaximumFont );

    return font;
}


private float getWidthInPixelsOfString ( String str, float fontSize, Graphics gc )
{
    Font font = gc.getFont ().deriveFont ( fontSize );

    return getWidthInPixelsOfString ( str, font, gc );
}

private float getWidthInPixelsOfString ( String str, Font font, Graphics gc )
{
    FontMetrics fm = gc.getFontMetrics ( font );
    int nWidthInPixelsOfCurrentFont = fm.stringWidth ( str );

    return (float) nWidthInPixelsOfCurrentFont;
}


private float getHeightInPixelsOfString ( String string, float fontSize, Graphics gc )
{
    Font font = gc.getFont ().deriveFont ( fontSize );

    return getHeightInPixelsOfString ( string, font, gc );
}

private float getHeightInPixelsOfString ( String string, Font font, Graphics gc )
{
    FontMetrics metrics = gc.getFontMetrics ( font );
    int nHeightInPixelsOfCurrentFont = (int) metrics.getStringBounds ( string, gc ).getHeight () - metrics.getDescent () - metrics.getLeading ();

    return (float) nHeightInPixelsOfCurrentFont * .75f;
}
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A different, obvious way would be to have the text pre-drawn on a bitmap, and then shrink the bitmap to fit the rectangle; but, because of hand-crafted font design and hinting etc., finding the right font size produces the best-looking (although perhaps not the quickest) result.

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