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What is the fastest algorithm for circle shifting array for m positions?
For example [3 4 5 2 3 1 4] shift m = 2 positions should be [1 4 3 4 5 2 3]

Thanks a lot

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15 Answers 15

up vote 25 down vote accepted

If you want O(n) time and no extra memory usage (since array was specified), use the algorithm from Jon Bentley's book, "Programming Pearls 2nd Edition". It swaps all the elements twice. Not as fast as using linked lists but uses less memory and is conceptually simple.

shiftArray( theArray, M ):
    size = len( theArray )
    assert( size > M )
    reverseArray( theArray, 0, size - 1 )
    reverseArray( theArray, 0, M - 1 )
    reverseArray( theArray, M, size - 1 )

reverseArray( anArray, startIndex, endIndex ) reverses the order of elements from startIndex to endIndex, inclusive.

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I wonder when would you actually need to do physical array shifting. –  Vinko Vrsalovic May 18 '09 at 6:04
1  
@Vinko: Perhaps as a part of larger task of computing several cycle-shifts applied to different overlapping parts of an array. –  Rafał Dowgird May 18 '09 at 8:17
    
I'd replace assert(size>M) with M = M % size and check for M==0. That would make the function more flexible. –  Georg Schölly Oct 8 '09 at 11:13
    
In terms of number of swaps, this algorithm is not optimal. –  Aryabhatta May 19 '10 at 20:49
    
@Vinko i use this algorithm. We have small arrays that have about 100 elements, and perform lots of operations on them. It has to be an array because we need random access for most operations. Creating a linked list would be much slower than just the in-place swap. So for us its an performance issue. Allocating memory is expensive. –  martinus Mar 15 '12 at 18:01

It's just a matter of representation. Keep the current index as an integer variable and when traversing the array use modulo operator to know when to wrap around. Shifting is then only changing the value of the current index, wrapping it around the size of the array. This is of course O(1).

For example:

int index = 0;
Array a = new Array[SIZE];

get_next_element() {
    index = (index + 1) % SIZE; 
    return a[index];
}

shift(int how_many) {
    index = (index+how_many) % SIZE;
}
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4  
This could be written a little clearer. Perhaps something like "instead of updating the array, update an integer storing the current start of the array". Also, this approach turns an O(1) operation -- push/pop -- into an O(n) operation, so there are obvious tradeoffs. –  chrispy Aug 3 '09 at 22:16

Set it up with pointers, and it takes almost no time. Each element points to the next, and the "last" (there is no last; after all, you said it was circular) points to the first. One pointer to the "start" (first element), and maybe a length, and you have your array. Now, to do your shift, you just walk your start pointer along the circle.

Ask for a good algorithm, and you get sensible ideas. Ask for fastest, and you get weird ideas!

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But wouldn't you end up in checking for end each time while traversing the list? –  Naveen May 18 '09 at 5:05
    
yeah, but that's fast. Or you can use modulo (or bitwise AND if list is a power of 2). –  Jason S May 18 '09 at 13:47
    
You would check for end anyway, even with a conventional array. But if you keep a length, it's as simple as writing a loop or decrementing a count to zero. –  gbarry May 19 '09 at 6:15
    
The question asks for arrays not linked lists. –  Javad Apr 27 at 18:42

Keep two indexes to the array, one index starts from beginning of the array to the end of array. Another index starts from the Mth position from last and loops through the last M elements any number of times. Takes O(n) at all times. No extra space required.

circleArray(Elements,M){
 int size=size-of(Elements);

 //first index
 int i1=0;

 assert(size>M)

 //second index starting from mth position from the last
 int i2=size-M;

 //until first index reaches the end
 while(i1<size-1){

  //swap the elements of the array pointed by both indexes
  swap(i1,i2,Elements);

  //increment first pointer by 1
  i1++;

  //increment second pointer. if it goes out of array, come back to
  //mth position from the last
  if(++i2==size) i2=size-M;

 }
}
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There is bug in your implementation! See my post above! –  0xDEAD BEEF Jul 19 '10 at 9:16

Depending on the data structure you use, you can do it in O(1). I think the fastest way is to hold the array in the form of a linked list, and have a hash table that can translate between "index" in the array to "pointer" to the entry. This way you can find the relevant heads and tails in O(1), and do the reconnection in O(1) (and update the hash table after the switch in O(1)). This of course would be a very "messy" solution, but if all you're interested in is the speed of the shift, that will do (on the expense of longer insertion and lookup in the array, but it will still remain O(1))

If you have the data in a pure array, I don't think you can avoid O(n).

Coding-wise, it depends on what language you are using.

In Python for example, you could "slice" it (assume n is the shift size):

result = original[-n:]+original[:-n]

(I know that hash lookup is in theory not O(1) but we're practical here and not theoretical, at least I hope so...)

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See this if you are interested in a Java implementation:

Programming Pearls: Circular Left/Right Shift Operation

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C arrayShiftRight function. If shift is negative the function shifts array left. It is optimized for less memory usage. Running time is O(n).

void arrayShiftRight(int array[], int size, int shift) {
    int len;

    //cut extra shift
    shift %= size;

    //if shift is less then 0 - redirect shifting left
    if ( shift < 0 ) {
        shift += size;
    }

    len = size - shift;

    //choosing the algorithm which needs less memory
    if ( shift < len ) {
        //creating temporary array
        int tmpArray[shift];

        //filling tmp array
        for ( int i = 0, j = len; i < shift; i++, j++ ) {
            tmpArray[i] = array[j];
        }

        //shifting array
        for ( int i = size - 1, j = i - shift; j >= 0; i--, j-- ) {
            array[i] = array[j];
        }

        //inserting lost values from tmp array
        for ( int i = 0; i < shift; i++ ) {
            array[i] = tmpArray[i];
        }
    } else {
        //creating temporary array
        int tmpArray[len];

        //filling tmp array
        for ( int i = 0; i < len; i++ ) {
            tmpArray[i] = array[i];
        }

        //shifting array
        for ( int i = 0, j = len; j < size; i++, j++ ) {
            array[i] = array[j];
        }

        //inserting lost values from tmp array
        for ( int i = shift, j = 0; i < size; i++, j++ ) {
            array[i] = tmpArray[j];
        }
    }
}
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def shift(nelements, k):       
    result = []
    length = len(nelements)
    start = (length - k) % length
    for i in range(length):
        result.append(nelements[(start + i) % length])
    return result

This code works well even on negative shift k

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+1 but it use additional list –  Arsen Mkrtchyan Oct 15 '12 at 8:44

circelArray has some errors and is not working in all cases! :/ EDIT: loop must continue while i1 < i2 NOT i1 < last - 1

void Shift(int* _array, int _size, int _moves)
{
    _moves = _size - _moves;
    int i2 = _moves;
         int i1 = -1;
         while(++i1 < i2)
    {
    	int tmp = _array[i2];
    	_array[i2] = _array[i1];
    	_array[i1] = tmp;
    	if(++i2 == _size) i2 = _moves;
    }
}

THIS WORKS! :) 0xDEAD BEEF

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this code only works on specific cases, so it's no good. for example, if you have 5, 9, 4, 0, 11 and you shift it by 3, it will give you 4, 0, 11, 9, 5 instead of 4, 0, 11, 5, 9. –  epicrose Nov 18 '12 at 17:11
static int [] shift(int arr[], int index, int k, int rem)
{
    if(k <= 0 || arr == null || arr.length == 0 || rem == 0 || index >= arr.length)
    {
        return arr;
    }

    int temp = arr[index];

    arr = shift(arr, (index+k) % arr.length, k, rem - 1);

    arr[(index+k) % arr.length] = temp;

    return arr;
}
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This should work to shift an arry circularly: Input : { 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8 }; Output value present in array after the forloops : {8,7,1,2,3,5,6,8,7}

 class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int[] array = { 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8 };
            int index = 2;
            int[] tempArray = new int[array.Length];
            array.CopyTo(tempArray, 0);

            for (int i = 0; i < array.Length - index; i++)
            {
                array[index + i] = tempArray[i];
            }

            for (int i = 0; i < index; i++)
            {
                array[i] = tempArray[array.Length -1 - i];
            }            
        }
    }
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@JerryPenner solution doesn't use O(n) additional memory –  Arsen Mkrtchyan Feb 25 '13 at 9:40

Ruby example:

def move_cyclic2 array, move_cnt
  move_cnt = array.length - move_cnt % array.length 
  if !(move_cnt == 0 || move_cnt == array.length)            
    array.replace( array[move_cnt..-1] + array[0...move_cnt] )  
  end   
end
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In theory, the fastest one is a loop like this:

if (begin != middle && middle != end)
{
    for (i = middle; ; )
    {
        swap(arr[begin++], arr[i++]);
        if (begin == middle && i == end) { break; }
        if (begin == middle) { middle = i; }
        else if (i == end) { i = middle; }
    }
}

In practice, you should profile it and see.

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Here is a nother one (C++):

void shift_vec(vector<int>& v, size_t a)
{
    size_t max_s = v.size() / a;
    for( size_t s = 1; s < max_s; ++s )
        for( size_t i = 0; i < a; ++i )
            swap( v[i], v[s*a+i] );
    for( size_t i = 0; i < a; ++i )
        swap( v[i], v[(max_s*a+i) % v.size()] );
}

Of course it is not nearly as elegant as the famous reverse-three-times solution, but depending on the machine it can be similary fast.

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/* This algorithm runs in O(n) time and O(1) space. The idea is trace each cyclic group in the shift (numbered by nextGroup variable). */

        var shiftLeft = function(list, m) {
        var from = 0;
        var val = list[from];
        var nextGroup = 1;
        for(var i = 0; i < list.length; i++) {
            var to = ((from - m) + list.length) % list.length;
            if(to == from)
                break;

            var temp = list[to];
            list[to] = val;
            from = to;
            val = temp;

            if(from < nextGroup) {
                from = nextGroup++;
                val = list[from];
            }
        }
        return list;
    }

    document.write(shiftLeft([1,2,3,4,5,6], 1));
    document.write("<br>");
    document.write(shiftLeft([1,2,3,4,5,6], 2));
    document.write("<br>");
    document.write(shiftLeft([1,2,3,4,5,6], 3));
    document.write("<br>");
    document.write(shiftLeft([1,2,3,4,5,6], 4));
    document.write("<br>");
    document.write(shiftLeft([1,2,3,4,5,6], 5));
    document.write("<br>");
    document.write(shiftLeft([1,2,3,4,5,6], 6));
    document.write("<br>");
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