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Currently I'm setting my client connection for node-mysql by doing the following in my app.js and a special config/environment.js:

var client = mysql.createClient({
  user:     'USER',
  database: 'DATABASE',
  password: 'PASSWORD',
  host:     'HOST'
});

app.configure(function(){
  ...
  app.set('client', client);
  ...
});

Then in my client code I just call app.settings.client to use the MySQL client.

I'm not sure if this is the right approach, and it certainly doesn't work when I'm doing testing, as I need a running instance of the app.

Any suggestions?

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1  
Use app.set('client') instead of app.settings.client. And it should work with testing, you just need to inject an empty app into your unit test as part of mocking –  Raynos Jan 6 '12 at 19:31
    
@Raynos How do you inject an empty app? –  Josh Smith Jan 6 '12 at 19:41
    
depends on your code. I do something like this but I would assume your architecture is completely different. –  Raynos Jan 6 '12 at 19:45
    
@Raynos I've got an open question with bounty on it about how to handle MySQL mocking. If you could take a stab, I'd be a happy man. –  Josh Smith Jan 6 '12 at 19:49
1  
app.set(key, value); sets the value app.set(key) gets the value. The fact that the value lives in app.settings.client is an implementation detail and might be changed. It's safer to use public documented APIs –  Raynos Jan 6 '12 at 19:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are 3 solutions the way I see it:

a) As @Raynos suggested in the comments, use app.set(key, value); to set a db value and then app.set(key) to get that value.
b) Wrap your routes into a function that accepts the database as a parameter. Example:

sample_route.js

module.exports = function (db) {
  return function(req, res, next) {
    // db is accessible here
  }
}

app.js

var = sample_route = require('./sample_route')(db);
app.get('/sample', sample_route);


c) Make a global variable that will be accessible everywhere (not recommended though): global.MY_DB = ...;

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I think that a more typical way to do this would be to define a simple middleware that sets the mysql client as a property of the request. For example:

var client = mysql.createClient({
      user:     'USER',
      database: 'DATABASE',
      password: 'PASSWORD',
      host:     'HOST'
    })

app.use(function(req, res, next) {
    req.mysql = client;
    next();
});

Then in your route handlers you can access req.mysql. In your test cases you just need to set up req.mysql in some way, it should be pretty easy.

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3  
That's horrible. Your creating a new mysql objcet per request :( –  Raynos Jan 6 '12 at 19:45
    
@Raynos Yeah, that's why I use app.set(). –  Josh Smith Jan 6 '12 at 19:46
1  
Ok well create the client globally, it is still convenient to have req.mysql and seems to fit in well with the Express architecture of passing req, res around. –  kgilpin Jan 6 '12 at 19:54

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