Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

EDIT: RESOLVED. The problem was much more benign - I had two functions that were called inside one another in one line of code - both used lexical_cast and the other one was crashing. It's interesting that I was only able to find this out by sprinkling in a lot of cout's as there was no backtrace upon crash and when debugging line be line, gdb was for whatever reason showing the wrong lexical_cast as the culprit (and I didn't see the other one, sigh). Thanks for the help!


I'm using gcc 4.1.2 and boost 1.48. I have the following code in a shared library inside a template function:

try {
  boost::lexical_cast<T>(s);
}
catch (...) {
  std::cout << "Caught it" << std::endl;
  throw;
}

The cast fails, but the exception doesn't get caught (it does propagate and terminate the program, but this catch-clause doesn't catch it). T is long and s is a std::string equal to "234a234". (I also tried wrapping the boost includes in #pragma GCC visibility push(default) and also tried adding -shared-libgcc flag when linking, and that didn't do anything.)

It gets better though. In the following two cases the exception DOES get caught:

try {
  throw boost::bad_lexical_cast();
}
catch (...) {
  std::cout << "Caught it" << std::endl;
  throw;
}

and amazingly this one:

try {
  boost::lexical_cast<T>(s);
  throw boost::bad_lexical_cast();
}
catch (...) {
  std::cout << "Caught it" << std::endl;
  throw;
}

Any ideas on what's going on and more importantly how to fix this?

share|improve this question
    
Why not catch boost::bad_lexical_cast& or std::exception& instead? It doesn't answer your question but maybe it'll help the compiler out. –  Joel Jan 6 '12 at 19:44
    
Tried that - doesn't help :( –  eddi Jan 6 '12 at 19:48

2 Answers 2

I'm not able to reproduce on my machine but I'm using a different compiler

gcc version 4.2.1 (Based on Apple Inc. build 5658) (LLVM build 2336.1.00)

I used the following as a test:

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/lexical_cast.hpp>
#include <string>
#include <exception>

using namespace std;

template<typename T>
T printLexicalCast(const std::string& s){
    T t;
    try {
         t = boost::lexical_cast<T>(s);
         cout << "cast is [" << t << "] from string [" << s << "]" << endl;
    }
    catch (const boost::bad_lexical_cast& e ) {
      std::cout << "Caught bad lexical cast with error " << e.what() << std::endl;
    }
    catch( ... ){
        std::cout << "Unknown exception caught!" << endl;
    }
    return t;
}   


int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {

    std::string badString("234a234");
    long l1 = printLexicalCast<long>(badString); //exception


    std::string goodString("123456");
    long l2 = printLexicalCast<long>(goodString); 

    return 0;
}

I get the following output:

Caught bad lexical cast with error bad lexical cast: source type value could not be interpreted as target
cast is [123456] from string [123456]

If I remove the bad_lexical_cast catch the catch-all works.

Unknown exception caught!
cast is [123456] from string [123456]

Maybe this is just a compiler bug? I found this on the boost-users list

http://boost.2283326.n4.nabble.com/conversion-lexical-cast-doesn-t-throw-td2593967.html

share|improve this answer
    
As far as I understand this is a shared library only issue. I can catch the exceptions when I don't use any libraries, but once I put the code in a library it stops working. There is some discussion about exceptions in shared libraries here and here, but those things didn't help me. –  eddi Jan 6 '12 at 20:59
    
For completeness - my actual code structure is slightly more complicated - the exception is inside a library that's used by another library that I'm using. –  eddi Jan 6 '12 at 21:07

That will happen if BOOST_NO_EXCEPTIONS is getting defined somewhere.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not. Maybe I was a little unclear - the boost::bad_lexical_cast exception IS thrown and the program terminates, but that exception does NOT get caught in the catch block. –  eddi Jan 6 '12 at 19:58
    
That is bizarre. I see your catch clause rethrows it. Have you set a breakpoint there, or are you counting on std::cout to see if you caught the exception? –  Drew Dormann Jan 6 '12 at 20:58
    
I tried setting a breakpoint - it never gets there. In fact when it dies I can't even get a normal backtrace - it just shows libgcc smth and then just a couple of frames of ???'s –  eddi Jan 6 '12 at 21:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.