Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I find out the type of a variable when inheritance is involved?

I'm having a little situation, I'll describe it in pseudocode:

class A
{
public:
A();
virtual ~A();

protected:
//some members
};

class B : public A
{
public:
B();
virtual ~B();

protected:
//some members
};

///////////////////////

int main()
{
A* pA = new B();
std::cout<<"type of pA: "<< ???;
}

How can I find out the type of pA? the result should be B. Also, what should I do if I want the result to be A?

Thanks.


EDIT:

I'll let you be the judge of whether it is bad design or not. If you think it is, then please tell me a better alternative.

Code:

class MyContactReport : public NxUserContactReport
{
    void OnContactNotify(NxContactPair& pair, NxU32 events)
    {
        if (pair.actors[0]->userData == NULL || pair.actors[1]->userData == NULL) return;

        LevelElement* otherObject = (LevelElement*)pair.actors[1]->userData;
        LevelElement* triggerObject = (LevelElement*)pair.actors[0]->userData;

        switch(events)
        {
        case NX_NOTIFY_ON_START_TOUCH:
            triggerObject->OnContactStartTouch(otherObject);
            break;
        case NX_NOTIFY_ON_END_TOUCH :
            triggerObject->OnContactEndTouch(otherObject);
            break;
        case NX_NOTIFY_ON_TOUCH:
            triggerObject->OnContactTouch(otherObject);
            break;
        }
    }
} *myReport;

pair.actors[1]->userData gives me access to the userData from an actor, an actor is something of the PhysX framework, that determines collisions and physics etc. The userdata is of type void*. This is also the only way to find out object the actor actually belongs to.

Then there's class LevelElement, an abstract class where every object in my level inherits from (level as in a game-level)

LevelElement has protected virtual methods: OnContactTouch(LevelElement* pOtherElement) etc... In those methods, I need to find out what type of LevelElement it is, to take certain specific measures.

Is this bad design? If yes, please help!

share|improve this question
    
Why do you care? Your code should not make decisions based on the runtime type of an object. Your objects should be able to do the job of an A via the interface that A provides, objects of type B will implement the interface in a specific way. –  Loki Astari Jan 6 '12 at 20:27
    
One reason could be for example for logging. –  Emil Styrke Jan 6 '12 at 20:30
    
@LokiAstari Because I'm working with frameworks that require this kind of information. I'll update the question to provide that information. –  xcrypt Jan 6 '12 at 20:39
    
The simple fact is that if you need different actions per type then you're misusing polymorphism. –  ildjarn Jan 6 '12 at 21:23
2  
@xcrypt: Then you have misunderstood what you were taught. Polymorhism allows different types to do different things without the user knowing the type. If you are do doing different things based on the type at the use point you are not using polymorphism. The whole idea is that the object knows what to do just ask it to do the task then each different type will do the correct action. –  Loki Astari Jan 6 '12 at 23:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use the typeid operator, as described for example here.

Basically:

#include <typeinfo>

[...]

std::cout << "typeid(*pA): " << typeid(*pA).name() << std::endl;
std::cout << "typeid(pA): " << typeid(pA).name() << std::endl;

Results, with g++ 4.4.5:

typeid(*pA): 1B
typeid(pA): P1A

I.e. there is some mangling involved at least using gcc. Check out this question for how to deal with this.


EDIT: As for your design question, instead of checking what type the otherObject is, a better solution is to just tell this object what to do. Assuming you want to code the onContactTouch for a hypothetical Bullet object; instead of

switch (type) {
case PLAYER:
    (Player*)otherObject->dealDamage(10);
    break;
case BULLETPROOF_GLASS:
    (BulletproofGlass*)otherObject->ricochet();
    break;
}

do this:

otherObject->onHitByBullet(this);

This is sometimes called the tell, don't ask principle.

share|improve this answer
    
typeid(pA) should be A*; the type of the object is not A, so that would be wrong anyway. –  UncleBens Jan 6 '12 at 20:12
2  
It should be added that it's usually a "smell" that it's a bad design if you need to determine the type of an object at runtime. –  RandolphCarter Jan 6 '12 at 20:16
    
@UncleBens: good point, I fixed the answer. –  Emil Styrke Jan 6 '12 at 20:22
2  
In any case, to use typeid() you need to have turned RTTI on in your compiler settings. A more detailed discussion about RTTI can be found here: RTTI –  Clemens Jan 6 '12 at 20:30
    
@nyarlathotep please come up with an alternative if you say things like that. I have updated the question to give you more information –  xcrypt Jan 6 '12 at 21:00

This is not strictly a symptom of bad design. Although you certainly could abstract the types out of the type checking. For the sake of performance and runtime customization, you should almost definitely NOT use RTTI or other direct type checking systems. Implementing your own (much simplified) type checking dynamic allows objects to define collision behavior at an object level rather than a class level and to redefine collision behavior at runtime.

//PSEUDO CODE
enum CollisionTypes = {HARD_THING, SOFT_THING, EXPLODING_THING};

class FragileThing is a GameObject
{
    public function getCollisionType()
    {
        return SOFT_THING;
    }
    public function collideWith(GameObject obj)
    {
        if (obj.getCollisionType() == SOFT_THING)
            print "whew...";
        else
            print "OUCH!";
    }
}

class CollisionDispatcher is a PhysXCollisionListener
{
    public function getCollisionFromPhysX(Collision col)
    {
        col.left.collideWith(col.right);
        col.right.collideWith(col.left);
    }
}

Another system that I have seen used (in books) is to use an engine wide messaging framework to dispatch collisions with type information embedded into the message. Unrelated types can simply ignore the messages. I have not tried this though. I would also recommend examining your LevelObject class to determine if there isn't some kind of common functionality you can add to it that would sidestep this problem. For instance, if there are very few fundamental types of objects (Red and Green perhaps, or Ethereal, Soft, Hard, Explosive) then you can, instead of conditional statements, encode those types into function calls: function collideWithSomethingHard(LevelObject obj) thus allowing objects to define only the collision behavior they care about. Hope this helps a little.

share|improve this answer
    
I've done something like this, thanks. –  xcrypt Jan 6 '12 at 22:37

If you need to do that, then most likely your interface is lacking or designed sub-optimally. Instead revisit your interface and provide an appropriate set of (possibly abstract) virtual methods to implement your required interface. Then you won't need to worry about specific subypes.

If you really need the information you can use typeid as seen in the answer from @Emil Styrke

share|improve this answer
    
I have updated the question. Do you think it is avoidable? –  xcrypt Jan 6 '12 at 21:01

When you use the function typeid(pA).name() . The result is class A *.

// typeid
#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>
using namespace std;

class A
{
    public:
        A(){}
        virtual ~A(){}

    protected:

};

class B : public A
{
    public:
        B(){}
        virtual ~B(){}

    protected:

};


int main()
{
A* pA = new B();

   cout<<"The expression [A* pA = new B()]: \n";
   cout<<"Has datatype --> "<< typeid(pA).name()  <<"<-- \n";
   cout<<" \n";

   return 0;
}

Output :

The expression [A* pA = new B()]:
Has datatype --> class A *<--

Press any key to continue
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.