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Let's say I have the following date ranges in Ruby:

Sat, 01 Jan 2011..Tue, 01 Feb 2011

Wed, 05 Jan 2011..Thu, 17 Feb 2011

Wed, 02 Feb 2011..Tue, 01 Mar 2011

Sun, 01 Jan 2012..Thu, 05 Jan 2012

By what process can I take all four of these ranges and get output that tells me there is a break in the ranges on Wed, 02 Mar 2011?

EDIT Sergio is right and there appears to be nothing built in. I can grok this like so:

x = Range.new(Date.parse('2011-01-01'), Date.parse('2011-02-01'))
r = Range.new(Date.parse('2011-01-05'), Date.parse('2011-02-17'))
y = Range.new(Date.parse('2011-02-02'), Date.parse('2011-03-01'))
z = Range.new(Date.parse('2012-01-01'), Date.parse('2012-01-05'))

ranges = [x,y,z,r]

dates = ranges.collect!{|r|r.to_a}.flatten!.uniq!.sort!

dates.delete_if do |date|
  index = ranges.index(date)
  next_date = ranges[index + 1]
  next_date == date + 1 || next_date.nil?
end

Still looking for the best solution though.

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There's no built-in function that does this. Try to figure out something. –  Sergio Tulentsev Jan 6 '12 at 20:23
1  
what is "a break in the ranges"? maybe you can put together some valid Ruby code with assertions. –  tokland Jan 6 '12 at 20:40
    
ok, you probably mean "what date starts a gap in the ranges"? but what if the ranges create several gaps, you want only the first one? –  tokland Jan 6 '12 at 20:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ruby's Enumerable.chunk is useful here. I shortened the ranges being checked for simplicity, and added an additional range that was out of order, to show that it's handling out of order ranges:

require 'date'

date_ranges = [
  '01 Jan 2011', '03 Jan 2011',
  '02 Jan 2011', '04 Jan 2011',
  '02 Mar 2011', '03 Mar 2011',
  '01 Jan 2000', '02 Jan 2000'
].each_slice(2).map{ |dates| 
  Range.new( 
    *dates.map{ |d| 
      Date.parse(d) 
    } 
  ) 
}

gaps = date_ranges
  .inject([]){ |a, d| a |= d.to_a }   # accumulate the unique dates in the ranges
  .sort                               # sort to get them in ascending order
  .each_with_index                    # add an offset into the order
  .chunk{ |d,i| d - i }               # group by the delta
  .to_a[1 .. -1]                      # grab all but the first group
  .map{ |g,dates| dates.first.first } # strip off the groups and indexes

puts gaps

Outputs:

2011-01-01
2011-03-02

Because I added the out of order range, the original starting range is now a gap, as is the March 02 2011 date.

This will give you an example what chunk is doing:

[1,2,3,4,5].each_with_index.chunk{ |n,i| n-i }.to_a # => [[1, [[1, 0], [2, 1], [3, 2], [4, 3], [5, 4]]]]
[1,2,  4,5].each_with_index.chunk{ |n,i| n-i }.to_a # => [[1, [[1, 0], [2, 1]]], [2, [[4, 2], [5, 3]]]]
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The way I would approach that would be something like (completing this left as an exersize for the reader):

class DateRange
  def initialize (start, end)
    ...
  end

  def interection (range)
    # Determine the intersection of the current range and another
    # Returns either nil or a new DateRange object.
    ...
  end

  def expand (range)
    # Expand the current range to include the passed in range
    ...
  end
end

class DateRangeSet
  include Enumerable

  def <<(range)
    # Inspect the current ranges, and any that have an intersection, merge them
    ...
  end

  def each
    @ranges.each { |r| yield r }
  end
end

Assuming your input is an array of [start,end] arrays, something like:

coll = DateRangeCollection.new
input.each { |s, e| coll << DateRange.new(s,e) }
puts "Gaps found!" if coll.to_a.count > 1

That being said... Maybe there's a more succinct way?

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Array arithmetic:

date_ranges = [
  '01 Jan 2011', '03 Jan 2011',
  '02 Jan 2011', '04 Jan 2011',
  '02 Mar 2011', '03 Mar 2011',
  '01 Jan 2000', '02 Jan 2000'
].each_slice(2).map{ |dates| 
  Range.new( 
    *dates.map{ |d| 
      Date.parse(d) 
    } 
  ) 
}

dates = date_ranges.collect{|r| r.to_a}.flatten

((dates.min..dates.max).to_a - dates).min
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