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I have an input file and it is very big (about 120M), and I do not want to load it into memory at once. My purpose is to check whether this file is using valid UTF-8 encoding encoded file. Any ideas to have a quick check without reading all file content into memory in the form of byte[]? Simple sample code appreciated.

I am using VSTS 2008 + C#.

thanks in advance, George

I find it is very strange, when using XMLDocument to load an XML document which contains invalid byte sequences, there is exception, but when reading all content into byte array then check against UTF-8, there is no exception, any ideas?

Here is the content of my XML file,

http://i42.tinypic.com/wioc9c.jpg

You can download the file from,

http://www.filefactory.com/file/ag00da3/n/a_xml

EDIT1:

class Program
{
    public static byte[] RawReadingTest(string fileName)
    {
        byte[] buff = null;

        try
        {
            FileStream fs = new FileStream(fileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read);
            BinaryReader br = new BinaryReader(fs);
            long numBytes = new FileInfo(fileName).Length;
            buff = br.ReadBytes((int)numBytes);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
        }

        return buff;
    }

    static void XMLTest()
    {
        try
        {
            XmlDocument xDoc = new XmlDocument();
            xDoc.Load("c:\\abc.xml");
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
        }
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        try
        {
            XMLTest();
            Encoding ae = Encoding.GetEncoding("utf-8");
            string filename = "c:\\abc.xml";
            ae.GetString(RawReadingTest(filename));
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
        }

        return;
    }
}

EDIT2: I have tried when using new UTF8Encoding(true, true) there will be exception, but when using new UTF8Encoding(false, true), there is no exception thrown. I am confused because it should be the 2nd parameter which controls whether exception is thrown when there is invalid byte sequences, why the 1st parameter matters?

    public static void TestTextReader2()
    {
        try
        {
            // Create an instance of StreamReader to read from a file.
            // The using statement also closes the StreamReader.
            using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(
                "c:\\a.xml",
                new UTF8Encoding(true, true)
                ))
            {
                int bufferSize = 10 * 1024 * 1024; //could be anything
                char[] buffer = new char[bufferSize];
                // Read from the file until the end of the file is reached.
                int actualsize = sr.Read(buffer, 0, bufferSize);
                while (actualsize > 0)
                {
                    actualsize = sr.Read(buffer, 0, bufferSize);
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            // Let the user know what went wrong.
            Console.WriteLine("The file could not be read:");
            Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
        }

    }
share|improve this question
    
Isn't almost any sequence of bytes, even random byte values, valid UTF8? Or are there some byte value sequences that are not valid UTF8? –  ChrisW May 18 '09 at 5:46
1  
Not all of them, there are some exceptions, please refer here, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UTF-8#Invalid_code_points –  George2 May 18 '09 at 5:49
1  
@ChrisW: Absolutely not; UTF-8 has specific encoding rules. –  Lawrence Dol May 18 '09 at 5:53
1  
When you Encoding.GetEncoding("utf-8"), you get an encoding with replacement fallback function — invalid characters get translated to "?" or something like that. XMLDocument.Load evidently creates an encoding with a throw-on-error fallback function. –  Anton Tykhyy May 18 '09 at 9:42
1  
1. See MSDN on Encoding.GetEncoding(string,XxxFallback,YyyFallback), use reflector. 2. You shouldn't set the fallback function to null, at best you'll get some unspecified default value. What you need is a DecoderExceptionFallback object, but the call to UTF8Encoding(true,true) in my snippet creates it for you. –  Anton Tykhyy May 18 '09 at 10:31

3 Answers 3

var buffer = new char[32768] ;

using (var stream = new StreamReader (pathToFile, 
    new UTF8Encoding (true, true)))
{
    while (true)
    try
    {
        if (stream.Read (buffer, 0, buffer.Length) == 0)
            return GoodUTF8File ;
    }
    catch (ArgumentException)
    {
        return BadUTF8File ;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But if a character using multiple bytes span chunks, how do you handle such situation? –  George2 May 18 '09 at 5:48
1  
@George - the reader will deliver decoded chunks, which you just discard. If the entire stream decodes, it was valid. No question of encoded bytes spanning the chunks of chars you read. –  Lawrence Dol May 18 '09 at 5:51
1  
Just keep calling TextReader.Read(char[], int, int), reusing the same buffer. The reader makes sure that it copes with multi-byte characters. –  Jon Skeet May 18 '09 at 6:01
1  
@George2 You can create a FileStream and pass that to TextReader. that is how you use streams effectively with the readers. –  Spence May 18 '09 at 8:44
1  
No, Spence: TextReader is an abstract base class for StreamReader and StringReader. –  ChrisW May 18 '09 at 8:46

@George2 I think they mean a solution like the following (which I haven't tested).

Handling the transition between buffers (i.e. caching extra bytes/partial chars between reads) is the responsibillity and an internal implementation detail of the StreamReader implementation.

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Text;

class Test 
{
    public static void Main() 
    {
        try 
        {
            // Create an instance of StreamReader to read from a file.
            // The using statement also closes the StreamReader.
            using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(
                "TestFile.txt",
                Encoding.UTF8
                ))
            {
                const int bufferSize = 1000; //could be anything
                char[] buffer = new char[bufferSize];
                // Read from the file until the end of the file is reached.
                while (bufferSize == sr.Read(buffer, bufferSize, 0)) 
                {
                    //successfuly decoded another buffer's-worth of data
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e) 
        {
            // Let the user know what went wrong.
            Console.WriteLine("The file could not be read:");
            Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@ChrisW, a small bug, Read(buffer, bufferSize, 0), should be Read(buffer, 0, bufferSize). :-) Another issue is, I find your method and using XMLDocument.Load will have different results. Your method will never throw any exception even if there is invalid byte sequences of UTF-8 in underlying file (e.g. TestFile.txt), but XMLDocument.Load will throw exception. Please refer to EDIT1 section of my original post. Any ideas what is wrong? –  George2 May 18 '09 at 7:34
1  
I don't know (I was only giving a code example to parrot the suggestions below). What exception are you catching? Do you know (independently) whether or not the UTF8 in the file is correct? If you're sure it's incorrect, and the code above isn't failing, try running the code with Visual Studio set to catch exceptions when they're thrown, instead of only when they're unhandled? Because maybe (though I wouldn't know why) the StreamReader implementation silently catches any Encoding exceptions. –  ChrisW May 18 '09 at 8:23
1  
If you want to read the file using XmlDocument.Load, I'd try removing the begining-of-file marker: the first three 0xEF 0xBB 0xBF bytes. –  ChrisW May 18 '09 at 8:58
1  
catch (Exception e) is a really bad idea. –  Anton Tykhyy May 18 '09 at 9:43
1  
@George2: in this case of catch(Exception), you'll also catch file-not-found, access denied, etc. which is likely not what you need. Re change default behaviour: create your own DecoderReplacementFallback object. –  Anton Tykhyy May 18 '09 at 10:33

Would this not work?

StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(file);

Console.WriteLine(reader.CurrentEncoding.ToString()); //You get the default encoding
reader.Read();

Console.WriteLine(reader.CurrentEncoding.ToString()); //You get the right encoding. 
reader.Close();

If not can someone help explain why?

share|improve this answer

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