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I have some data (originally in data files) that I wanted to be stored in the database.

Data file might have different tracking strategy and hence different columns.

Tracking data A:

NodeID
Date
max_X@9am-10am 
min_X@9am-10am
max_Y@9am-10am 
min_Y@9am-10am
max_speed@9am-10am
min_speed@9am-10am
max_X@10am-11am 
min_X@10am-11am
max_Y@10am-11am 
min_Y@10am-11am
max_speed@10am-11am
min_speed@10am-11am
...

Tracking data B:

NodeID
Date
avg_X@9am-9:30am 
avg_Y@9am-9:30am 
avg_speed@9am-9:30am
avg_X@10am-10:30am 
avg_Y@10am-10:30am 
avg_speed@10am-10:30am
...

Tracking data C:

NodeId
Date
avg_X@the.whole.day
avg_Y@the.whole.day
min_X@the.whole.day
max_X@the.whole.day
min_Y@the.whole.day
max_Y@the.whole.day
sum_MovingDistance@the.whole.day
avg_Speed@the.whole.day

In short, one data file stores some node's position range,speed, in different time intervals, for a given day. Outside the data file there are area hierarchy, e.g. Country:US.

Then, every tracking data has two version, one is historical and one is real-time. Historical contains summarized data and they don't change. Real-time data is generated during the advance of the time. When the time hasn't reach a time interval there is no value (NA) . When the time is in a time interval, every time the real-time data file is generated the values change.

So I have some options

One: storing different types of data files in different tables, and the column of the database table can match the columns in the data file. This will results in many talbes, is this generally a bad thing that should be avoid?

Two: Stroing data files in one table. Probobly something like

Area, NodeID, TrackingStratygy, VarName,             Value    DataType    recordTime  
US    KKEA1   A                 max_X@9am-10am        ??      real-time   09:55@20111203
US    KKEA1   B                 avg_X@9am-9:30am      ??      real-time   09:55@20111203
US    KKEA1   C                 avg_Y@the.whole.day   ??      daily       00:00@20111202

Problem with this is the massive replication of area, nodeID, tracking stratyge and varname.

Any comments and input is welcome.

Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

The first thing you need to do is work out what you want as an end result. Presumably some sort of report?

Does the end result need to show everything (historical/new) in the same format?

Is the historical data going to be archived off?

Is the new data being generated in the different formats and is that a business requirement that the db has to reflect?

I'm sure there are other questions...

If the new data is being generated in different formats; and you are required to report on those formats then the easiest (not necessarily best) option would be to use multiple tables (if not multiple db instances).

If you are standardising the reporting then you will need to look at what fields are replicated in each format and which could be created from the source data where they aren't exact copies. Then it becomes a normalisation task with separate tables for the non-matching data.

Your example "Two: Storing data files in one table" is hideous. If you are going down that path then normalise out anything you can - e.g. Area, NodeID etc.

Ultimately this is a business logic question rather than a db question as far as I would be concerned. Find out what the requirements are and model the db to make retrieval of data as simple as possible for the end users without compromising whatever security/storage/business rules you might have in place.

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Option One would be the "official" approach; as long as you can re-construct the lines by combining entries in the tables, you're good (though it does take time/effort to join the tables).

Option Two looks to be better suited to having a DYNAMIC set of fields. For what you've described, I think its way too flexible & incurs too much overhead for what you need.

Another option would be to have a single table, with all of the possible fields, some of which would be empty for certain records. This is somewhat inefficient space-wise, but avoids the overhead of having to join up records. If there aren't many of these fields, and not that many records with such fields, then the overhead might be worth having only 1 table to work with, and avoiding the joins.

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If you could swing it, getting your incoming data changed to this format would probably be best:

Tracking_Data
====================
nodeId  -- along with locationTrackedInstant, the unique PK
locationTrackedInstant -- timestamp, in terms of UTC
xPosition  -- whatever your RDBMS uses for location info, and dependent on scale
yPosition
areaId -- Only use if x/y aren't GPS coordinates, as I suspect they may be.

This would allow you to extract whatever information you want, much better than your current data (for example, what was the average speed between 09:30 and 10:30?). It probably requires the least amount of space to store of all the options, although you'll lose a little processing time for the aggregation functions (but if your RDBMS has materialized views, you can trade it back).

You can almost restructure it to a single table that looks like this:

Tracking_Data          -- why, oh why, are these at different resolutions?
                       -- and seperated?  They measure the same things...
======================
nodeId
aggregatePeriodStart  -- timestamp
periodDurationInSeconds  -- only due to aggregates.  Alternate units possible.
min_X
max_X
avg_X
min_Y
max_Y
avg_Y
max_Speed
min_Speed
avg_Speed
distance_travelled

However, you've got data at different resolutions - crucially, max/min values are at a higher resolution than the averages (the reverse is not a problem). You unfortunately can't infer the 'missing' data, as it wouldn't actually be correct. So, you're stuck with some similar looking tables:

Tracking_Data_A
====================
nodeId
aggregatePeriodStart  -- timestamp
perdiodDurationInHours
min_X
max_X
min_Y
max_Y
min_Speed
max_Speed

Tracking_Data_B
===================
nodeId
aggregatePeriodStart  -- timestamp
periodDurationInMinutes
avg_X
avg_Y
avg_Speed

Tracking_Data_C
===================
nodeId
aggregateDate  -- date, not timestamp
min_X
max_X
avg_X
min_X
max_X
avg_Y
avg_Speed
distanceTravelled

The overhead of each individual table is minimal, compared to the overhead of the actual data contained. And despite the perceived 'flexibility' of EAV tables, you end up with monster statements to reconstruct anything; they also don't index or sort properly.
Oh, and don't forget to qualify your units - specifically, speed and distance (miles v. kilometers).

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