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Hi I'm going through regular expressions but I'm confused about metacharacters, particularly '*' and '?'.

'*' is supposed to match the preceding character 0 or more times.

For example, 'ta*k' supposedly matches 'tak' and 'tk'.

But I wouldn't have thought this to be true at all - here's my reasoning:

for tak:

regexp: I need a 't'

string: I have 't'

regexp: okay, your next character needs to be an 'a'

string: yes it is

regexp: okay, keep giving me characters until your character isn't an 'a'

string: okay. I've just given you 'k'

regexp: okay, your next character needs to be a 'k'

string: I don't have any more characters left!

regexp: fail

for tk:

regexp: I need a 't'

string: I have 't'

regexp: okay, your next character needs to be an 'a'

string: no, it's a 'k'

regexp: fail

Can someone clarify for me why 'tak' and 'tk' matches 'ta*k'?

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Why would you expect that? The result as is match the intended semantics of the metacharacters. The course of action you described doesn't. –  delnan Jan 6 '12 at 20:39
    
Also re-tagged: there's nothing about Action-Script in this question. –  Dacav Jan 6 '12 at 20:40
    
Hey thanks for the help guys, all your answers made sense. I guess the point to take home is that when regex parses itself, it needs to look forward from any literals to see if there are any metacharacters about, and then test that all together. I guess my next question would be something along the lines of 'what if there are loads of metacharacters together like '.*?', but I'll read that site FakeRainBrigand left and see if I can figure it out myself :) –  xdl Jan 6 '12 at 22:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

* does not mean to match a character zero or more times, but an atom zero or more times. A single character is an atom, but so is any grouping.

And * means zero or more. When the regex cursor has "swallowed" the t, the positions are:

in the regex: t|a*k
in the string: t|ak

The regex engine then tries and eats as as much as possible. Here there is one. After it has swallowed it, the positions are:

in the regex: ta*|k
in the string: ta|k

Then the k is swallowed:

in the regex: ta*k|
in the string: tak|

End of regex, match. Note that the string may have other characters behind, the regex engine doesn't care: it has a match.

In the case where the string is tk, before a* the positions are:

in the regex: t|a*k
in the string: t|k

But * can match an empty set of as, therefore a* is satisfied! Which means the positions then become:

in the regex: ta*|k
in the string: t|k

Rinse, repeat. Now, let's take taak as an input and ta?k as a regex: this will fail, but let's see how...

# before first character
regex: |ta?k
input: |taak
# t
regex: t|a?k
input: t|aak
# a?
regex: ta?|k
input: ta|ak
# k? Oops! No...
regex: |ta?k
input: t|aak
# t? Oops! No...
regex: |ta?k
input: ta|ak
# t? Oops! No...
regex: |ta?k
input: taa|k
# t? Oops! No...
regex: |ta?k
input: taak|
# t? Oops! No... And nothing to read anymore
# FAIL

Which is why it is VERY important to make regexes fail FAST.

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"the string may have other characters behind, the regex engine doesn't care: it has a match." -- That's not right. Regular expressions are usually greedy. That means they will match as many characters as possible (with some exceptions, but this isn't one). If you meant "lorem tak ipsum" would still match, that depends on the implementation, and variations are often present in the same language/tool. –  FakeRainBrigand Jan 6 '12 at 22:28
    
Yes it's right: it has matched its input, it stops there. –  fge Jan 6 '12 at 22:29
    
"If you meant "lorem tak ipsum" would still match, that depends on the implementation" <-- it will ALWAYS matchn whatever the regex engine! And always tak for that matter. –  fge Jan 6 '12 at 22:42
    
In Python, re.match(r'ta*k', 'lorem tak ipsum') returns none. Just saying... –  FakeRainBrigand Jan 7 '12 at 0:35
    
Yes, because Python makes the exact same mistake as Java for naming... A regex does NOT have to match its whole input. NEVER. You have to use .search. –  fge Jan 7 '12 at 10:59

Because a* means "zero or more instances of a".

When "it" asks for all characters that aren't "a", once it has one, it (roughly) pushes it back into the input stream. (Or it peeks ahead, or it just keeps it, etc.)

First sequence: here's your first non-"a", I'll hold on to that. You need a "k" next, that's what I have.

Second sequence: the next character doesn't need to be an "a"--it may be one or more "a". In this case it's none. I'll hold on to that non-"a". You need a "k"? I got your "k" right here still.

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You are one character ahead:

regexp: okay, keep giving me characters until your character isn't an 'a'

string: next character is not an 'a'

regexp: okay, your next character needs to be a 'k'

string: next char is a 'k'

So it works. Note that 'a*' means "0 or more occourrences of 'a'", and not "1 or more occources of 'a'". For the latter one there's the '+' sign, like in 'a+'.

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ta*k means, one 't', followed by 0 or more 'a's, followed by one 'k'. So 0 'a' characters, would make 'tk` a possible match.

If you want "1 or more" instead of "0 or more", use the + instead of *. That is, ta+k will match 'tak' but not 'tk'.

Let me know if there's anything I didn't explain.


By the way, RegEx doesn't always go left to right. The engine often backtracks, peeks ahead and studies the input. It's really complicated, which is why it's so powerful. If you looks at sites such as this one, they sometimes explain what the engine is doing. I recommend their tutorials because that's where I learned about RegEx!

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Oh I didn't know that... I'll check out the website, thanks! –  xdl Jan 6 '12 at 21:51

The fundamental thing to remember is that a regular expression is a convenient shorthand for typing out a set of strings. a{1,5} is simply shorthand for the set of strings (a, aa, aaa, aaaa, aaaaa). a* is shorthand for ([empty], a, aa, aaa, ...).

Thus, in effect, when you feed a regular expression to a search algorithm, you are telling it the list of strings to search for.

Consequently, when you feed ta*k to your search algorithm, you are actually feeding it the set of strings (tk, tak, taak, taaak, taaaak, ...).

So, yes, it is useful to understand how the search algorithm will work, so that you can offer the most efficient regular expression, but don't let the tail wag the dog.

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