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I've a vector and several classes (located in separate files) to modify the one.
I want to have global access to the std::vector, but only within the derived classes when each call stores the result of previous and the last object should return the total result

Could you explain how to build a high-performance interface using Decorator pattern with std::vector?
I may be wrong, and may need other pattern.

// A.h
class A () {
      public : 
           vector<int> set(vector<int> &vec);

            //return total result
           vector<int> get() {
               return vector;
           }
};

// B.h
class B () {
    //add new elements into vector
    //for example, add 2,3,4
};

// C.h
class C () {
    //remove some elements from vector
    //for example, remove last element
};

//...

// main.cpp
#include "A.h"
#include "B.h"
#include "C.h"

int main () {

    vector<int> set;
    set.push_back(1); //1

    C obj(new B(new A()));
    obj.set(set);
    obj.get(); // stores 1,2,3 (added by classes A, B, C)
}

So, I don't want to do like this:

vector<int> set1;
set1.push_back(1);

A *A_init;
A_init->set(set1); //add 1

vector<int> set2 = A_init->get();

B *B_init;
B_init->set(set2); //add 2, stores 1,2

vector<int> set3 = B_init->get();

C *C_init;
C_init->set(set3); //add 3, stores 1,2,3

vector<int> set4 = C_init->get();

/..

And I want to do like this:

vector<int> set;
set.push_back(1);

C obj(new B(new A()));
obj.set(set);
obj.get(); // stores 1,2,3

I've a simple impementation of a pattern Decorator.
But it is not quite what I need ((

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>

class A {
    public:
        virtual void operation() = 0;
    };

class Component : public A {
    public:
        virtual void operation() {
            std::cout<<"World!"<<std::endl;
        }
};

class B : public A {
    std::unique_ptr<A> add;

public:
    B(A *component): add(component) {}

    virtual void operation() {
        std::cout << ", ";
        add->operation();
    }
};

class C : public A {
    std::unique_ptr<A> add;

public:
    C(A *component): add(component) {}

    virtual void operation() {
            std::cout << "Hello";
            add->operation();
    }
};

int main() {
    C obj(new B(new Component()));
    obj.operation(); // prints "Hello, World!\n"

    return 0;
}

PS: Sorry for not so clear explanation, because I don't know English so well

share|improve this question
    
Could you try and rephrase the question(s?) ? It is unclear to me what is being asked. At its simplest, are you wanting to sum the elements of vector<int> or something else entirely? –  hmjd Jan 6 '12 at 20:52
    
Your first block of code has some serious issues, such as an uninitialized init variable. –  crashmstr Jan 6 '12 at 20:54
    
@hmjd, I want to modify vector<int> (add or remove element) in global scope (or something like that), but using several classes and return total result (modified vector). –  Duglas Jan 6 '12 at 21:00
    
Using a local vector<int> and passing it by reference to several classes/methods for modification would be preferable to having an object at global scope. –  hmjd Jan 6 '12 at 21:04
1  
I have a hierarchy of classes where each class returns a modified version of the common vector. And I don't want to do a separate initialization for each class. This is the main reason for choosing Decorator pattern –  Duglas Jan 6 '12 at 21:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From what you've described, Decorator is not the pattern to be looking at.

It sounds to me like you simply want to set up a chain of transformers to operate upon a common vector – i.e. a simple functional composition. This differs from Decorator in terms of the relationship to the object at the core - you are not building something to stand in for a vector, you are building something to operate upon it. Now when you take multiple transformers, you could theoretically imagine the second and later transformers as decorators of the first, but given the simplicity of the objects involved, trying to apply the GoF decorator implementation to your situation is probably going to be overkill.

You can KISS by doing something like this:

#include <vector>

using namespace std;
typedef vector<int> ivec;

ivec& a(ivec& v) {
    v.push_back(1);
    return v;
}

ivec& b(ivec& v) {
    v.push_back(2);
    v.push_back(3);
    v.push_back(4);
    return v;
}

ivec& c(ivec& v) {
     v.pop_back();
     return v;
}

There are three simple transformation functions, each written so that the output of one can be fed right into the input of the next. Then you can do something like:

ivec& xform(ivec& v) {
    return c(b(a(v)));
}

ivec v;
xform(v);

if you want to just build up your final transform statically and apply it.

As an alternate implementation, let's say you wanted to build up a set of transformers dynamically. In that case, you can push the functions into a vector of transformers and apply them one by one:

#include <vector>
using namespace std;

typedef ivec& (*ivec_xformer)(ivec&);
typedef vector<ivec_xformer> xform_vec;
xform_vec xforms;
xforms.add(&a);
xforms.add(&b);
xforms.add(&c);

ivec v;
for (xform_vec::iterator i = xforms.begin(); i != xforms.end(); ++i) {
   (*i)(v);
}

This loop at the end, btw, can be further "simplified" with boost::bind and std::for_each if you're so inclined.

The dynamic chain of transformers bears some resemblance to a Chain of Responsibility, except that there's no concept of having a particular object stop the chain by "handling" the request, i.e. there's no real responsibility associated with this solution – each function gets an equal crack at the vector. I'd suggest this pattern needs a better name – one probably already exists out there, as this kind of functional composition in OO programming is not uncommon, but it eludes me at the moment.

share|improve this answer

Here it goes:

#include <vector>
#include <cstdio>

/* A class that operates on an std::vector. */
class Vector
{
public:
    virtual std::vector<int> & getVector() = 0;
    virtual void operation() = 0;
    virtual ~Vector() {}
};

/* Basic implementation of Vector. */
class BasicVector : public Vector {
public:
    BasicVector(std::vector<int> & refVector) : intVector(refVector) {}
    void operation() {
        intVector.push_back(2);
    }
    std::vector<int> & getVector() {
        return intVector;
    }
private:
    std::vector<int> & intVector;
};

/* First decorator. */
class VectorDecorator1 : public Vector
{
public:
    VectorDecorator1(Vector & refVec) : intVec(refVec) {}
    std::vector<int> & getVector() {
        return intVec.getVector();
    }
    void operation() {
        intVec.operation();
        intVec.getVector().push_back(3);
    }
private:
    Vector & intVec;
};

/* Second decorator. Others can be easily added in the future. */
class VectorDecorator2 : public Vector
{
public:
    VectorDecorator2(Vector & refVec) : intVec(refVec) {}
    std::vector<int> & getVector() {
        return intVec.getVector();
    }
    void operation() {
        intVec.operation();
        intVec.getVector().push_back(4);
    }
private:
    Vector & intVec;
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    std::vector<int> my_vector;
    my_vector.push_back(1);
    BasicVector basic_vector(my_vector);
    VectorDecorator1 vd1(basic_vector);
    VectorDecorator2 vd2(vd1);
    vd2.operation();
    for(unsigned i = 0; i < my_vector.size(); i++) {
        printf("%d\n", my_vector[i]);
    }
    return 0;
}

Note: if you prefer, it's easy to change BasicVector to make it operate on its own std::vector (instead of a reference).

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